Interwoven explores the range of native Andean responses to the pressures of colonialism and forced labor in Quito's textile economy. Drawing from a rich and varied source base of archival documents, ethnographic fieldwork, and secondary scholarship, Rachel Corr sheds light on how “global processes of Spanish colonialism, encomiendas, the labor draft, and tribute” affected the indigenous peoples who resided in the highland town of Pelileo, where San Ildefonso—one of Ecuador's largest and longest-lasting obrajes—was located (p. 18). In particular, she pays attention to the significant intersections of gender, migration, family, and kinship ties in shaping the divergent historical trajectories of four indigenous groups—the Pilalata, Chumaquí, Guambaló, and Sigchos Collanas—who lived in the shadow of the textile mill of San Ildefonso.

The first chapter provides a brief overview of the geographic setting and ethnic history of Pelileo, a town where indigenous populations...

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