In Mexico, mineral waters flowing from natural springs, spurting out of artesian wells, supplied by bathhouses, and consumed as effervescent refreshments are at the center of a centuries-long yet little-explored relationship between humans and the environment. Daily interactions with these waters in the form of bathing, swimming, and drinking as well as the meanings ascribed to such activities constitute the various water cultures analyzed in Casey Walsh's Virtuous Waters: Mineral Springs, Bathing, and Infrastructure in Mexico. As Walsh demonstrates, human-water encounters throughout the long modern period, lasting from roughly 1500 to the present, were guided by and representative of a host of sociocultural discourses ranging from moral to medical, from scientific to therapeutic, and from leisure to legal. Salient among them is a deep-seated and resilient belief in the heterogeneity of waters, the idea that waters are not only of multiple...

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