In 2017, more Mexican journalists were killed than in any country other than Iraq and the active war zone of Syria. Reporters without Borders's 2018 rankings for press freedom placed Mexico 147th out of 180 countries—the lowest ranking of any country in Latin America other than Cuba. As the introduction to Journalism, Satire, and Censorship in Mexico argues, “Journalism is more dangerous, and consequently more constrained, now than at any other point in modern Mexican history” (p. 2).

This is a disturbing conclusion to reach, given the rather triumphant narratives that emerged about Mexican journalism in the years of more democratic optimism after the end of the long period of Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) dominance. The standard narrative is that under the PRI, both journalism and civil society more generally experienced severe constraints. Journalists were bought off and intimidated, and media sources...

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