In Hemispheric Indigeneities, editors Miléna Santoro and Erick D. Langer bring together some of the finest scholars of indigenous studies and the history of Latin America and Canada. One of the threads that ties the essays together is the multiplicity of indigenous histories, influences, and identities. Métis historian David McNab, who like a few of the other contributors is an indigenous intellectual, pointedly notes that “if you speak only about pan-Indian identities, you give lie to the enormous diversities in languages, cultures, and people” (p. 364). Throughout the volume, the contributors chart the successes, challenges, and marginalization of indigenous peoples and how their relationships to power evolved over time.

The editors' goal of comparing indigenous realities across the Americas (excepting the United States) to “spark new and even surprising insights and connections” is laudable, though this reader would have liked more...

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