Recent years have seen a steady and encouraging growth of academic interest in what is often called transnational history, rethinking local phenomena through global approaches. Nonetheless, this perspective has not yet produced a consistent body of research examining the Latin American clash of ideas that characterized the short twentieth century (1914 to 1991). This is particularly regrettable because this continent, due to the complex imbrication of ideological references and multiple political connections, deserves to be examined within a global perspective, in order to paint a broader picture beyond customary national categories by engaging in comparative and connected analysis.

Edited by the Chile-based historian Patricio Herrera González, El Comunismo en América Latina aims to expand our understanding of the Latin American Left, from the first regional influences of the Bolshevik Revolution to the immediate aftermath of Jacobo Árbenz's fall in 1954, which signaled...

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