In the last few years, the academic interest in Argentina about the history of Peronism has not receded. The literature dedicated to this political phenomenon has incorporated new topics, questions, and methodologies. At the same time, the history of the social sciences in Argentina has emerged as a prolific area of research. The book under review, written by Samuel Amaral, can be related to these two scholarly undertakings but does not fully correspond to either. In El movimiento nacional-popular, Amaral studies in detail the different interpretations of Peronism given by sociologist Gino Germani over the course of his three-decade career. Germani, an Italian émigré in Argentina when Juan Perón rose to the presidency in 1946, is considered one of the founders of scientific sociology in Argentina. He had a central role in this discipline's institutionalization in the country. His early interpretations of Peronism's emergence have had a long-lasting influence...

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