Until recently, Cuba has been neglected by American ecclesiastical historians. However, starting in the late twentieth century such authors as Eduardo Torres Cuevas, Edelberto Leyva Lajara, Ana Irisarri Aguirre, and Consolación Fernández Mellén have renovated this historical topic, and Arelis Rivero Cabrera's book is a good illustration of this renewed interest. The book is divided into a lengthy introduction, five chapters, and an epilogue, in addition to twenty appendixes.

The opening chapter, after a balanced synthesis of the regular clergy's settlement in the Indies, deals with the deployment of Franciscan convents in the island between 1530 and 1750; by the end of this period, there were nine convents and a hospice. Initially, they were included under the province of Santa Cruz, in Hispaniola, but from the early seventeenth century they were attached to the province of Santa Elena, which also included the...

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