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harjo

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Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 133–155.
Published: 01 April 2010
...Craig Womack “Suspicioning” examines the silences that surround issues of same-sex desire in and out of the poetry of Joy Harjo. Duke University Press 2010 (Muscogee Creek) Suspicioning Imagining a Debate between Those Who Get Confused, and Those Who Don’t, When They Read Critical...
Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 69–92.
Published: 01 April 2010
..., but it is possible to imagine together what decolonization means and could look like, within our particular political contexts. It is this imagination that is the strongest part of our decolonial struggles. As Joy Harjo states in her poem “A Post- colonial Tale,” “Our children put down...
Journal Article
GLQ (2012) 18 (4): 615–617.
Published: 01 October 2012
..., Erai, Clive Aspin’s piece on Takatapui identity in Maori communities, and June Scudeler’s essay on Gregory Scofi eld’s Cree Métis stories. Ultimately, I was taken with the editors’ claim, borrowing a term from Joy Harjo, that this book is an imagining, an emergence story. To believe...
Journal Article
GLQ (2012) 18 (4): 618–620.
Published: 01 October 2012
... stories. Ultimately, I was taken with the editors’ claim, borrowing a term from Joy Harjo, that this book is an imagining, an emergence story. To believe in the imagination might be one of the queerest acts we could perform as scholars and activists. Queer Indigenous Studies introduces us...
Journal Article
GLQ (2012) 18 (4): 621–623.
Published: 01 October 2012
... stories. Ultimately, I was taken with the editors’ claim, borrowing a term from Joy Harjo, that this book is an imagining, an emergence story. To believe in the imagination might be one of the queerest acts we could perform as scholars and activists. Queer Indigenous Studies introduces us...
Journal Article
GLQ (2012) 18 (4): 624–626.
Published: 01 October 2012
... stories. Ultimately, I was taken with the editors’ claim, borrowing a term from Joy Harjo, that this book is an imagining, an emergence story. To believe in the imagination might be one of the queerest acts we could perform as scholars and activists. Queer Indigenous Studies introduces us...
Journal Article
GLQ (2015) 21 (2-3): 183–207.
Published: 01 June 2015
... Human from the colonial inculcation and peaked awareness of spiritual transfor- mation in Muscogee poet Joy Harjo’s How We Became Human, or the solidification of sexual systems in relation to the adjudication of personhood in Mark Rifkin’s When Did Indians Become Straight? Kinship, the History...
Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 253–284.
Published: 01 April 2010
Journal Article
GLQ (2020) 26 (4): 621–647.
Published: 01 October 2020
Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 207–242.
Published: 01 April 2010
... and, indeed, its very existence. Straight folks need queers; without both, neither exists. Womack, drawing on Hudson’s analysis quoted above, opens up the queer significance of Mississippian anomaly in his reading of Joy Harjo’s poetry in Red on Red. He writes: “Rather than disrupting society...
Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 5–39.
Published: 01 April 2010
Journal Article
GLQ (2015) 21 (4): 459–499.
Published: 01 October 2015
... of color feminist writers including the Menominee poet Chrystos, the Muscogee poet Joy Harjo, AnaLouise Keating, Patricia Wil- liams, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Cherríe Moraga to illuminate how Native women’s experiences of marginalization are often similar to those of women of color.17...