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faerie

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Journal Article
GLQ (2009) 15 (1): 67–96.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Scott Lauria Morgensen Radical faerie culture produces modern sexual minorities by mediating their racial and national relationship to histories of colonization. Radical faeries arose in the US by forming itinerant rural gatherings--and, over time, landed rural sanctuaries to host them--where...
Journal Article
GLQ (2014) 20 (4): 521–527.
Published: 01 October 2014
....) Goldberg reenlivens these topics through superb close readings. I focus on Goldberg’s discussion of the Faerie Queene, as this is the text closest to my own heart. As Goldberg remarks, in a phrase that made me surfeit with delight, “Spenser studies . . . has been writing footnotes to C. S. Lewis...
Journal Article
GLQ (2018) 24 (4): 509–516.
Published: 01 October 2018
... Signs of Queerness and Disability . New York : New York University Press . Morgensen Scott Lauria . 2008 . “ Arrival at Home: Radical Faerie Configurations of Sexuality and Place .” GLQ 15 , nos. 1–2 : 67 – 96 . Morgensen Scott Lauria . 2010 . “ Settler Homonationalism...
Journal Article
GLQ (2014) 20 (1-2): 199–201.
Published: 01 April 2014
... between whiteness, queers of color, and “the settler colonial relationship to Native peoples and land” (146). We come to understand the possibility that queers of color and GLBTQ2 people use Radical Faerie culture to mark as well as displace whiteness. Thus these forms...
Journal Article
GLQ (2014) 20 (1-2): 201–203.
Published: 01 April 2014
... between whiteness, queers of color, and “the settler colonial relationship to Native peoples and land” (146). We come to understand the possibility that queers of color and GLBTQ2 people use Radical Faerie culture to mark as well as displace whiteness. Thus these forms...
Journal Article
GLQ (2014) 20 (1-2): 204–206.
Published: 01 April 2014
... relationship to Native peoples and land” (146). We come to understand the possibility that queers of color and GLBTQ2 people use Radical Faerie culture to mark as well as displace whiteness. Thus these forms of difference — race and indigeneity — are reliant on each other...
Journal Article
GLQ (2014) 20 (1-2): 207–209.
Published: 01 April 2014
...” (146). We come to understand the possibility that queers of color and GLBTQ2 people use Radical Faerie culture to mark as well as displace whiteness. Thus these forms of difference — race and indigeneity — are reliant on each other in that GLBTQ2 people readily adapt Radical...
Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 285–295.
Published: 01 April 2010
... is not able to accommodate practiced defiance or subtle and politicized deviation from the norm. Never­theless, Morgensen builds his critique in work he has done elsewhere on the radical faeries and new age culture by redacting his commitment to revising the queer economies of the protest tradition...
Journal Article
GLQ (2012) 18 (4): 453–479.
Published: 01 October 2012
Journal Article
GLQ (1995) 2 (3): 253–277.
Published: 01 June 1995
Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 105–131.
Published: 01 April 2010
Journal Article
GLQ (2007) 13 (4): 563–575.
Published: 01 October 2007
... an “independent, distinctly gay” form (164) while Dignity is not? Why are the Radical Faeries “subaltern/sectarian” rather than “popular”? The gradation has something to do with the perceived degree of organization, but it also reflects judg- ments of value. For this anthology...
Journal Article
GLQ (2001) 7 (1): 153–181.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., Queer Nation, and the Radical Faeries.11 MSU’s impressive, sometimes quirky assortment of LGBT materials is thanks to the contributions of Anne Tracy, a library assistant and bibliographer with Special Collections since 1969. Although she considers herself...
Journal Article
GLQ (2011) 17 (2-3): 223–241.
Published: 01 June 2011
... that are also not directly mediated by homophobia. In small intentional communities, such as the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival and Radical Faerie Sanctuaries, and also in rural places that are less selfconsciously exceptional, there remain zones of queer sociality that in ultimately...
Journal Article
GLQ (2021) 27 (3): 407–429.
Published: 01 June 2021
FIGURES
Journal Article
GLQ (2008) 14 (2-3): 191–215.
Published: 01 June 2008
... queer theory beyond women and men, gay and straight. They soon include, as Eve Sedgwick puts it, “pushy femmes, radical faeries, fantasists, drags, clones, leather folk, ladies in tuxedoes, feminist women or feminist men, masturbators, bull- daggers, divas, Snap! queens, butch...
Journal Article
GLQ (2010) 16 (1-2): 5–39.
Published: 01 April 2010