In Crip Colony: Mestizaje, US Imperialism, and the Queer Politics of Disability in the Philippines, Sony Coráñez Bolton investigates how the Filipino mestizaje is juxtaposed with the colonized indio and how the mestizo body is both a product and symbol of colonial rehabilitation (7). By considering early twentieth-century American political cartoons, mestizo colonial writings, and archival documents on the Sulu Muslim populations, Coráñez Bolton's work on the crip colonial critique focuses on the re-orientations of a class of educated mestizos, the debilitation of the indios, and disability discourse of the colonial apparatus. Complicating the role of the rehabilitated mestizo, this book extensively expands on the biopolitical exclusion of the indio from the liberal society of the mestizo and contributes to discourse on contemporary Philippine settler colonialism in the archipelago that was derived from the overlapping of distinct Spanish and American imperial projects on native bodies.

One of Crip...

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