Readers of queer American literature require no introduction to the conceptual rewards that arise when writers intermingle sex and God, queer experience and theology, freedom and religion. Think of Alice Walker's Color Purple and Shug Avery's elaboration of the nonbinary theology presenting God as “It,” a project taking prayer, faith, and divinity as vital components of Avery's womanist and queer thought. As Michael Cobb (2006: 170) notes of the theology in Walker's novel, “So much of what should not be said can be said by a religious language of ‘It,’ which inaugurates the important project of making the stories open to revision, reflection, play, and impression.” Picking up on the broader insights undergirding Shug Avery's sacred rhetoric—that religious potentials need not compete adversarially with queer potentials, that they might instead collaborate in shared flourishing—queer studies has seen a resurgence in the religious, including, most recently, a special issue...

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