T. J. Tallie's intricate historical work at the intersection of queer theory and critical indigenous studies maps late nineteenth-century Natal as a shifting, anxious field of play where settler colonial governance and African indigenous resistance are in a tempestuous embrace. Tallie sets the stage of settler colonial encounter in Natal, where a former Dutch trade outpost transformed into a British colony (through conquest of Zulu and Dutch militaries) that is never able to recruit the white European settler population it needs to establish majority rule. The colony's inability to establish majority settler rule and secure European settler reproductive futurity animates the settler/African Indigenous tensions that Tallie traces through the critical axes of race, gender, and sexuality.

Queering Colonial Natal is a critical intervention into the fields of African studies, settler colonial studies, and queer theory. As Tallie argues, the “critical study of...

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