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stigma

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Journal Article
Genre (1 December 2018) 51 (3): 237–266.
Published: 01 December 2018
... “strangers,” “outsiders,” and “others,” the notion of stigma best describes how these characters fit into Shakespeare’s dramatic vision. As such this essay combines the sociologist Erving Goffman’s theory of stigma with the literary historian Erich Auerbach’s account of “figural realism” to establish a...
Journal Article
Genre (1 September 2011) 44 (3): 405–423.
Published: 01 September 2011
... good.” Nevertheless, a reframing to well- being brings narratives with some advan- tages. Going for a wellness check, for example, may be acceptable in a way that checks for physical or mental problems are not, reducing in particular the stigma associated with coming forward for mental health...
Journal Article
Genre (1 March 2001) 34 (1-2): 11–32.
Published: 01 March 2001
... men. As a result, Valdivia explained that the region had acquired a stigma in the eyes of the Spaniards: Your Majesty shall know that when the Marquis D. Francisco Pizarro entrusted this enterprise to me, there was none that cared to come to this land, and those that most shunned...
Journal Article
Genre (1 September 2001) 34 (3-4): 169–178.
Published: 01 September 2001
... there wrote some of the most memorable pop songs of the twentieth century; that they did so from 9 to 5, with rents to pay and groceries to buy, seems not to have had the predict- ed deleterious effect. At the same time, the stigma of commercialism has sometimes had an equal- ly inspiring...
Journal Article
Genre (1 June 2004) 37 (2): 341–343.
Published: 01 June 2004
... imperialism that stigma- tized rhythm for appealing not to the mind but to the body, specifically the body of a dark-browed Other in need of enslavement, colonization, and of course, the Bible. By the 1940s, when "jazz" was cited in American films, it was likely to symbolize moral decay, as when Frank...
Journal Article
Genre (1 June 2004) 37 (2): 344–346.
Published: 01 June 2004
... imperialism that stigma- tized rhythm for appealing not to the mind but to the body, specifically the body of a dark-browed Other in need of enslavement, colonization, and of course, the Bible. By the 1940s, when "jazz" was cited in American films, it was likely to symbolize moral decay, as when Frank...
Journal Article
Genre (1 June 2004) 37 (2): 347–349.
Published: 01 June 2004
... imperialism that stigma- tized rhythm for appealing not to the mind but to the body, specifically the body of a dark-browed Other in need of enslavement, colonization, and of course, the Bible. By the 1940s, when "jazz" was cited in American films, it was likely to symbolize moral decay, as when Frank...
Journal Article
Genre (1 June 2004) 37 (2): 350–352.
Published: 01 June 2004
... engaged in the racist practice of linking African-American music to sexuality and crime. Butler cites the work of post-colonial theorists Robert Stam, Ella Shohat, and Lola Young who trace this pattern back to a Christian imperialism that stigma- tized rhythm for appealing not to the mind but to...
Journal Article
Genre (1 July 2014) 47 (2): 111–140.
Published: 01 July 2014
Journal Article
Genre (1 September 2011) 44 (3): 223–237.
Published: 01 September 2011
.... Czechmeister refers to the use of metaphor in a medical context as “a two- edged sword”: one capable of informing patients and lightening the load of their illness, but also capable of communicating “myth, fear and stigma” (1994). We are quite familiar with the claims of doctors and psychotherapists...
Journal Article
Genre (1 December 2016) 49 (3): 385–405.
Published: 01 December 2016
... that here alone could I break through the surface of appearances and strike some vein of fundamental humanity” (Glasgow 1943, 153). Glasgow’s decision to situate many of her early novels in New York is under- standable, given the stigma that the literary establishment of the time attached to...
Journal Article
Genre (1 March 2002) 35 (1): 143–165.
Published: 01 March 2002
... given another name—fiction—her tale-spinning might bear less of a stigma. In fact, Elizabeth's list of "things [she] likedabout Bell" constitutes a brief restatement of the qualities Rendell values in other novelists. Bell was, recalls Elizabeth, quite as interested in people as I was. She...
Journal Article
Genre (1 March 2007) 40 (1-2): 57–79.
Published: 01 March 2007
... image of generalized abjec- tion in which all individuals seem to bear the "same" crippling stigma in their 12 That this experience of truth also has ramifications for how art is experienced in the context of its commodification may be appreciated in light of T. W. Adorno's reflections: "For a...