The term incarceration implies more than the modern prison, but how far does and can it stretch? What are the experiences, ideologies, and power dynamics of nonvoluntary confinement? For this special issue, we invite articles that explore any facet of incarceration within France and its empire in any historical period. Given recent developments in historical and carceral scholarship, we particularly welcome articles that allow us to think through understandings of incarceration broadly and that shed light on the continuities and discontinuities in practices and conceptualizations of confinement in time and space.

Fresh historical research has been complicating foundational assumptions about histories of incarceration. While the work of Michel Foucault continues to shape the terrain, historians have been rethinking chronologies, connections, and spatial considerations. Historians of the early modern period, for instance, have been pushing back against interpretative narratives that emphasize the novelty of the modern period, drawing attention instead to...

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