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wabanaki

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 621–643.
Published: 01 October 2016
... but were blind to the fact that the Wabanaki peoples already understood themselves to be home. For the Passamaquoddy at Pleasant Point (Sipayik), resources such as birch bark and firewood were scarce, prompting them to harvest wood on private property for survival. Tension between private property...
FIGURES
Image
Published: 01 October 2016
Figure 1. Wabanaki homeland in the nineteenth century. Map by Stephen Bicknell Figure 1. Wabanaki homeland in the nineteenth century. Map by Stephen Bicknell More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (4): 681–682.
Published: 01 October 2020
... Society for Ethnohistory 2020 Matthew Bahar’s Storm of the Sea recalls a time when Indians from Massachusetts to Nova Scotia acted in concert to construct a “Dawnland dominion,” harnessing the sea to express a Native sovereignty that thwarted European imperial claims (111). Wabanaki trafficked...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 73–100.
Published: 01 January 2004
... revised much of the accepted wisdom of Wabanaki ethnohistory, including the very use of the term ‘‘Eastern Abenaki their work has tended to focus on more northern and eastern parts of the region.2 Still, much can be learned about the native territories and family relationships in south- Ethnohistory...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 445–466.
Published: 01 July 2014
... In ordinary times as well as in disaster, Mi’kmaw survival strategies relied on a wide variety of activities, solidarity, and aid practiced across families, broader kinship networks, local bands, the entire tribe, and even the wider Wabanaki Confederacy.3 Mi’kmaq’s subsistence and cultural identity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 167–168.
Published: 01 January 2018
.... The Narragansett, Pequot, Wampanoag, and Wabanaki all appear here, but so do the River Indians, the Raritan, the Massapequa, and the Munsee. The result is a transnational history that examines English and Dutch strategies alongside those of different indigenous peoples as they responded to one another, to global...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 197–211.
Published: 01 April 2011
... four Inuit (all of whom died) in 1576–77; three Virginia Indians in the 1580s; five Wabanakis kidnapped on the coast of Maine in 1605; Epenow, abducted from Martha’s Vineyard in 1611; Squanto a few years later; Pocahontas and a Powhatan delegation in 1616; the four “Mohawk Kings” in 1710...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 281–329.
Published: 01 April 2006
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 163.
Published: 01 January 2008
..., and the com- munity’s attempts to encourage drumming societies and language classes. In the 1970s Penobscot activists occupied Baxter State Park, collaborated with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 166.
Published: 01 January 2008
.... In the 1970s Penobscot activists occupied Baxter State Park, collaborated with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history of the controversial Maine Indian Land Settlement Act of 1980, from the initial discovery...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 169–170.
Published: 01 January 2008
..., and the com- munity’s attempts to encourage drumming societies and language classes. In the 1970s Penobscot activists occupied Baxter State Park, collaborated with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 170–172.
Published: 01 January 2008
... with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history of the controversial Maine Indian Land Settlement Act of 1980, from the initial discovery of an original copy of the treaty of 1794 in a shoebox to the joint...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 172–173.
Published: 01 January 2008
... with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history of the controversial Maine Indian Land Settlement Act of 1980, from the initial discovery of an original copy of the treaty of 1794 in a shoebox to the joint...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 174–175.
Published: 01 January 2008
.... In the 1970s Penobscot activists occupied Baxter State Park, collaborated with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history of the controversial Maine Indian Land Settlement Act of 1980, from the initial discovery...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 175–177.
Published: 01 January 2008
... with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history of the controversial Maine Indian Land Settlement Act of 1980, from the initial discovery of an original copy of the treaty of 1794 in a shoebox to the joint...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 177–178.
Published: 01 January 2008
..., and the com- munity’s attempts to encourage drumming societies and language classes. In the 1970s Penobscot activists occupied Baxter State Park, collaborated with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 178–180.
Published: 01 January 2008
..., and the com- munity’s attempts to encourage drumming societies and language classes. In the 1970s Penobscot activists occupied Baxter State Park, collaborated with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 180–181.
Published: 01 January 2008
... with other New England Indians in the Wabanaki Federation, and became involved in American Indian Movement causes. She traces the history of the controversial Maine Indian Land Settlement Act of 1980, from the initial discovery of an original copy of the treaty of 1794 in a shoebox to the joint...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 11–33.
Published: 01 January 2010
... known in the eastern Great Lakes. Other identities, like the stock dove (Wabanaki or Abenaki) or the elk (the Illinois), belong to different ethnocultural groups or are more widely known among the Anishinaabeg of the western Great Lakes. What follows below is a brief guide to reading...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 21–47.
Published: 01 January 2019
... Micah . 2016 . “ Wabanaki Homeland and Mobility: Concepts of Home in Nineteenth-Century Maine .” Ethnohistory 63 , no. 4 : 621 – 43 . Phillips George Harwood . 1993 . Indians and Intruders in Central California, 1769–1849 . Berkeley : University of California Press . “ Ranchos...
FIGURES