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virgin

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2002) 49 (3): 611–649.
Published: 01 July 2002
... within, that nobility. The procession was held under the aegis of Our Lady of Loreto, and the article seeks to explain the significance of this representation of the Virgin for colonial Inca nobles and postconquest Inca culture. It was formed by the “descendants of Gran Tocay Capac Inga,” a composite...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2002) 49 (4): 893–896.
Published: 01 October 2002
... of an important new voice in Mexican history. The Virgin, the King, and the Royal Slaves of El Cobre: Negotiating Free- dom in Colonial Cuba, By María Elena Díaz. (Stanford, Stanford University...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2003) 50 (2): 407–410.
Published: 01 April 2003
.... Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature. By Louise M. Burkhart. (Austin: University of Texas Press for the Insti- tute of Mesoamerican Studies, Albany, viii + pp., preface, introduction...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2014) 61 (4): 715–738.
Published: 01 October 2014
...Linda K. Williams Late seventeenth-century murals in the camarín of the colonial Church of the Conception in Tabí, Yucatán, include an unusual image of Saint Michael and a dragon in the birth chamber of the Virgin Mary. The murals of the camarín served as a backdrop for the miracle-working statue...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2018) 65 (3): 465–488.
Published: 01 July 2018
...Max Deardorff Abstract This article examines the interplay among belief, devotion, and indigenous politics in the early colonial New Kingdom of Granada. It does so by examining changes in the cacicazgo of Tinjacá in relation to the growth of the cult around the Virgin of Chiquinquirá, whose image...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2002) 49 (3): 545–582.
Published: 01 July 2002
... Ecuador . N. E. Whitten Jr.,ed. Pp. 677 -704. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. Infidels, Virgins, and the Black-Robed Priest: A Backwoods History of Ecuador’s Montaña Region Eduardo O. Kohn...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2002) 49 (2): 458–460.
Published: 01 April 2002
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2006) 53 (3): 479–505.
Published: 01 July 2006
...Paul Shankman In the Mead-Freeman controversy, Derek Freeman argued that historical sources support his view that the traditional values of the Samoan system of institutionalized virginity (or taupou system) were preserved and reinforced throughout the colonial era. A closer examination of two...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2000) 47 (3-4): 806–809.
Published: 01 October 2000
... Kindness of the Blessed Virgin looks at the con- cepts of the Virgin Mary and how these were understood in the native con- text. He concludes that indigenous reinterpretations of the Virgin Mary enabled her to play a special role as a bridge or gateway between Chris- tianity and native religion for...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2016) 63 (2): 423–424.
Published: 01 April 2016
... responsible for the spread of deadly disease throughout native North America. In particular, Kelton wages war on the “virgin soil” thesis—enshrined in the historiography by Alfred Crosby ( 1976 ) and in popular culture by Jared Diamond ( 1999 ) and Charles Mann ( 2006 , 2011 )—which Kelton claims has “place...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 January 2005
... wishes to explain in particular why native Ameri- can populations did not have the same demographic recovery patterns as Old World populations did from virgin soil epidemics. She makes the point that post-1492 native American populations did not experience one vir- gin soil epidemic at a time...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 198–200.
Published: 01 January 2005
..., Alchon wishes to explain in particular why native Ameri- can populations did not have the same demographic recovery patterns as Old World populations did from virgin soil epidemics. She makes the point that post-1492 native American populations did not experience one vir- gin soil epidemic at a time...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 200–201.
Published: 01 January 2005
... wishes to explain in particular why native Ameri- can populations did not have the same demographic recovery patterns as Old World populations did from virgin soil epidemics. She makes the point that post-1492 native American populations did not experience one vir- gin soil epidemic at a time...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2003) 50 (2): 405–407.
Published: 01 April 2003
... ETHNOHISTORY / 50:2 / sheet 163 of 170 transcribers and eds. (Guatemala City, p. Before Guadalupe: The Virgin Mary in Early Colonial Nahuatl Literature. By Louise M. Burkhart. (Austin: University of Texas Press for the Insti...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2007) 54 (1): 69–127.
Published: 01 January 2007
... the lords and rich principal men were each “assigned one woman, this did not stop them from having female slaves for concubines.”25 The earliest conquerors also commented on aspects of Maya sexuality that they considered strange or different. In terms of Maya concepts of virginity, a Spanish...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2014) 61 (3): 582–583.
Published: 01 July 2014
... plains to its nadir by the 1890s. The first five chapters trace the evolution of the fur trade from the pre- contact period to the end of the Hudson Bay Company’s monopoly. For specialists, this is very familiar ground: virgin soil epidemics, trade depen- dency, and ethnogenesis. Still...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2000) 47 (3-4): 816–818.
Published: 01 October 2000
... book. Based on a conference in the Virgin Islands commemorating the five-hundredth anniversary of that island’s ‘‘encounter’’ with Colum- bus, this book purposefully focuses attention toward native people. Broad in its scope, the book describes the indigenous people from the earliest...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2003) 50 (4): 758–761.
Published: 01 October 2003
... Puebla de los Pardos. Located on the outskirts of the city of Cartago, Puebla became operational as a community space in the1630s, after a series of images of the Virgin miraculously appeared to a free-colored woman. In...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2014) 61 (2): 361–363.
Published: 01 April 2014
... Sousa and Stafford Poole to produce a translation and analysis of the Nahuatl-­language story of the apparition of the Virgin of Guadalupe (1998). He worked with Susan Schroeder and Doris Namala to publish a translation and analysis of a colonial-­era “diario” of Mexico City, written by the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2014) 61 (3): 580–582.
Published: 01 July 2014
... 1890s. The first five chapters trace the evolution of the fur trade from the pre- contact period to the end of the Hudson Bay Company’s monopoly. For specialists, this is very familiar ground: virgin soil epidemics, trade depen- dency, and ethnogenesis. Still, Daschuk’s attention to detail...