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treaty

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Image
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 3. Reproductions of (a) Canandaigua Treaty belt, 1794, and (b) “Hiawatha” belt. The symbols represent the original Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, from left: Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga (represented by central Peace Tree), Oneida, and Mohawk. (c) Great Covenant Chain belt, ca. 1764 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 4. Treaty of Greenville map. Shaded areas represent lands ceded to the United States, including twelve strategic “reserves” (not all shown). Fort Miami and Fallen Timbers were within the “Twelve Miles Square Reserve” on the Maumee River. Image by author, adapted from Peters ( 1918 : 98 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 5. (a) Greenville Treaty belt (fragment). Note cut fringe on left. Courtesy of Ohio History Connection (H50297). (b) Fort Stanwix Treaty belt, 1784. Courtesy New York State Museum, Albany, NY. (c) Greenville Treaty belt, digitally restored according to the author’s analysis. Image More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (4): 741–743.
Published: 01 October 2011
...Richard S. Hill The Treaty of Waitangi Companion: Maori and Pakeha from Tasman to Today . Edited by O'Malley Vincent , Stirling Bruce , and Penetito Wally . ( Auckland : Auckland University Press , 2010 . x + 422 pp., preface, acknowledgments, note on entries, introduction...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 191–215.
Published: 01 April 2017
...Figure 3. Reproductions of (a) Canandaigua Treaty belt, 1794, and (b) “Hiawatha” belt. The symbols represent the original Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, from left: Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga (represented by central Peace Tree), Oneida, and Mohawk. (c) Great Covenant Chain belt, ca. 1764...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 29–48.
Published: 01 January 2020
...George Colpitts Abstract Before mass settlement occurred in Western Canada at the turn of the twentieth century, Indigenous people used treaty monetization and town spending to subvert the very forces of liberalism encouraged with the expansion of a colonial market economy. After 1880, the Cree...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 215–236.
Published: 01 April 2021
...Margaret Huettl Abstract Ojibwe leaders negotiated treaties with the United States amid nineteenth-century encroachments on their territory. These treaties, which were more than tools of dispossession, enfolded and extended aadizookanag (sacred stories) in agreements that embodied Ojibwe...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 449–451.
Published: 01 July 2021
... John , and Coyle Michael , eds. 2017 . The Right Relationship: Reimagining the Implementation of Historical Treaties . Toronto : University of Toronto Press . In sum, Calverley’s book Who Controls the Hunt? is an interesting study of conservation regulations and how they conflicted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 208–210.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Christopher J. Bilodeau Speculators in Empire: Iroquoia and the 1768 Treaty of Fort Stanwix . By Campbell William J. . ( Norman : University of Oklahoma Press , 2012 . xviii + 278 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, bibliography, index . $39.95 cloth.) Copyright...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 451–467.
Published: 01 July 2013
...Michael Asch This paper provides evidence that, notwithstanding the written text, Treaty 11 was a peace and friendship treaty rather than one in which the Dene surrendered ownership and jurisdiction of their lands to Canada, thereby indicating clearly that oral understandings better reflect...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 441–442.
Published: 01 April 2002
...’’ (249). This is an ambitious survey of the momentous changes that occurred in Kiowa country, especially after the 1867 Medicine Lodge Treaty, when their ability to control tribal affairs steadily declined...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 480–481.
Published: 01 July 2010
..., which highlights the very different trajectories native pasts and presents have taken in the two countries. John R. Wunder explains why treaties remain the most important part of First Nations’ relationships with the Canadian government while in the United States they have fallen from view...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 185–186.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Cameron Shriver Book Reviews 185 Seasons of Change: Labor, Treaty Rights, and Ojibwe Nationhood. By Chantal Norrgard. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2014. First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies Series. ix + 201 pp...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 622–623.
Published: 01 July 2006
...Gregory A. Waselkov Georgia and Florida Treaties, 1763-1776. Edited by John T. Juricek. Early American Indian Documents: Treaties and Laws, 1607-1789, vol. 12. Alden T. Vaughan, gen. ed. (Bethesda, MD: University Publications of America, 2002. xxx + 581 pp., preface, foreword, illustrations...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 149–151.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Brad D. E. Jarvis Faith in Paper: The Ethnohistory and Litigation of Upper Great Lakes Indian Treaties . By Cleland Charles E. with Greene Bruce R. , Slonim Marc , Cleland Nancy N. , Tierney Kathryn L. , Durocher Skip , and Pierson Brian . ( Ann Arbor...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 333–334.
Published: 01 April 2010
... the beleaguered choice to tell the story of contact through a display of guns, Bibles, and treaties. This is partly a problem of pedagogy: can the museum provoke its audiences via the visual, affective, and implied, or must it employ explicit, didactic instruction? It is also an ontological question: what...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 485–487.
Published: 01 April 2005
..., graduate students, and upper-level undergraduates who are interested in how these kinds of com- munities struggle to govern themselves. Mi’kmaq Treaties on Trial: History, Land, and Donald Marshall Junior. By William C. Wicken. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2002. xii + 301 pp...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 173–174.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Colin G. Calloway Book Reviews 173 Nation to Nation: Treaties between the United States and American Indian Nations. Edited by Susan Shown Harjo. (Washington, DC: Smithsonian Books, 2014. 272 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 423–447.
Published: 01 July 2009
... of allotments for Choctaws remaining in Mississippi granted by the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, a policy known as the “full-blood rule of evidence” legitimized their enrollment with the Choctaw Nation of Indian Territory following the Dawes Act. This paper analyzes how the Mississippi Choctaws...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 269–293.
Published: 01 April 2013
.... It views the massacre against the background of a long history of Blackfoot-American relations in order to assess why Blackfoot diplomatic maneuvers failed in this instance. Blackfoot leaders signed three peace treaties (1855, 1865, and 1868) with the United States, each of which decreased the size...