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traditional foods

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 1–35.
Published: 01 January 2011
... and the identities that define who we are as social, cultural, and historical beings. This article exam- ines early contacts on the Northwest coast, using food as a lens on cultural and envi- ronmental encounter. Drawing on oral tradition and on accounts of explorers such as George Vancouver, this article...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 407–427.
Published: 01 July 2021
... traditional foodways in the wake of colonialism. Copyright 2021 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2021 Indigenous corn Oneida Works Progress Administration food sovereignty Corn played a significant and historical role in the lives of many Indigenous people throughout the Americas...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 April 2015
... for Ethnohistory 2015 Indian Territory indigenous health indigenous foodways Five Tribes diabetes indigenous health decline traditional foods Sustenance and Health among the Five Tribes in Indian Territory, Postremoval to Statehood Devon A. Mihesuah, University of Kansas Abstract...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 183–199.
Published: 01 April 2010
... their wild food harvests with gardens of vegetables such as potatoes, rutabagas, and turnips. There is an extensive, and relatively well-known cropping tradition by the Haida and Tlingit peoples of the southeastern region of the state, but less known, however, are the early gar- dens...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 387–405.
Published: 01 April 2012
.... The traditional Tsimshian foods of dried salmon, eulachon oil, or berries may still have been o£ered at feasts, but they no longer were the signature foods; rather, a speci™ed number of hard bread pieces (biscuits) were distributed. In December 1886, sixty boxes of bread were given out at twenty pieces...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 479–507.
Published: 01 July 2009
... called khahaas (food procurement), were to prepare tar and butter by autumn (Savvin 2005: 100). 29 Carp (sobo) is a traditional food among Sakha. Apart from tasting good, it is considered to be a particularly Sakha fish. Catching carp in Faina’s story has a symbolic significance...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 391–415.
Published: 01 July 2018
... of Canada or the United States. They continued to migrate north and south of the border to hunt game and fish, to the frustration of government authorities responsible for their supervision and welfare. Just as the Ktunaxa learned to adapt to settlers disrupting access to traditional food gathering sites...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 215–246.
Published: 01 April 2018
... details about the layout or locations of household fields and gardens. They do, however, reveal that the Arikara continued to cultivate traditional foods like corn and beans, as well as introduced foods like potatoes, carrots, and onions (e.g., Mattoon 1896 : 230; Thomas 1904 : 296). A large garden...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 143–148.
Published: 01 January 2011
... of the EBCI past, but he does see the health benefits of a more traditional Cherokee diet of varied unrefined foods gathered and hunted in the woods and grown on small garden plots, foods that might mitigate the incidence of diabetes, gallstones, and cervical cancer. As much as healing can come...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (3): 473–487.
Published: 01 July 2003
... sepia-toned photograph of, supposedly, a husband (seated) and wife (standing). The arrangement is Victorian. A half-dozen photographs depict the contemporary making or enjoying of traditional food. The text to this link...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 677–700.
Published: 01 October 2004
...Carolyn Podruchny American Society for Ethnohistory 2004 Werewolves and Windigos: Narratives of Cannibal Monsters in French-Canadian Voyageur Oral Tradition Carolyn Podruchny, York University While traveling around Lake Superior in the 1850s, German explorer Jo- hann Georg Kohl...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 101–111.
Published: 01 January 2000
... New Guinea: The National Research Institute in association with the European Commission program “Avenir des peuples des forêts tropicales.” Craig, Barry, and David Hyndman, eds. 1990 Children of Afek: Tradition and Change among the Mountain Ok of Central New Guinea . Oceania Monograph 40. Sydney...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 485–504.
Published: 01 July 2013
..., or “our clan helpers” (cf. Kari 2007: 66), with a qeshqa, or “chief” or “rich man,” as leader (Fall 1987; Osgood 1976 [1937 In the traditional redistributive economy, the clan helpers, male members of a matrilineal clan and their wives, obtained and processed food resources—primarily salmon...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 75–99.
Published: 01 January 2018
... traders in matters related to food. Food-sharing was a deeply rooted ethos in Anishinaabe tradition, and by the late eighteenth century the Anishinaabe’s primary role in provisioning trade posts was deeply embedded in fur-trading practices—so much so that traders relied almost exclusively on their food...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 353–385.
Published: 01 April 2012
...] and no food prohibitions [mwiko ‡¼ Upon pressing informants further, most explained that it probably meant that the Pazi was a “pagan”—which in this context refers to a practitioner of a traditional African religion Further, they surmised, practitioners of traditional religions did not observe food...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 241–248.
Published: 01 January 2000
... easily and spontaneously, a natural accom- paniment to a journey whose milestones are the calendrical cycle of cere- monies and subsistence traditional to the Nim. When the snow gives way to spring, the story ends...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 127–148.
Published: 01 January 2020
... resistance and rebellion activities. Likewise, every time the Spaniards arrived in a valley, the locals hid their food supplies and abandoned their villages for the hills. This strategy was no different from that of the ones deployed by other native groups in Chile, which suggests traditional warfare...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 223–256.
Published: 01 April 2004
... and in the Jie harvest ritual are ‘‘repeated events’’ (Boyer 1990: 4), and they are integrated into wider local causalities. In these local traditional dramas, while sharing food and resources between ethnic communities and clans who occupy different ecological zones unites people, the refusal to share food...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 157–170.
Published: 01 April 2001
... the impact of faly (prohibition) in the traditional, even contemporary Vezo society. It is note- worthy that among the principal eleven retained prohibitions, food taboos have the strongest predominance. However, the sampled lineages...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 469–483.
Published: 01 July 2013
... harmonious, even “the best time to be Gwitchin.” Accounts of daily life emphasize the selective incorporation of European goods in ways that meshed with traditional ethics. The article contrasts these stories with Gwitchin descriptions of the Alfred Johnson manhunt, an event that brought the Canadian state...