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tomahawk

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2005) 52 (3): 589–633.
Published: 01 July 2005
...Timothy J. Shannon Since the colonial era, the tomahawk has served as a symbol of Indian savagery in American arts and literature. The pipe tomahawk, however, tells a different story. From its backcountry origins as a trade good to its customization as a diplomatic device, this object facilitated...
Image
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 2. (a) “IGS” belt attributed to John Graves Simcoe. The initial “I” indicates the formal “Ioannes.” Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution. (b) Road belt, now known commonly as a “Two Row” belt (reproduction). Courtesy of R. D. Hamell. (c) Algonquin Peace Tomahawk belt (detail). Courtesy of More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2018) 65 (1): 129–156.
Published: 01 January 2018
... fluffs on the tips of the bonnet’s feathers. Weapons include two lances, a tomahawk, and two shields, all drawn in the coup count scene on panel 3. Lances tipped with outsized metal points are used by both the protagonist and the coat-wearing warrior. The pedestrian carries his lance approximately in...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2017) 64 (2): 191–215.
Published: 01 April 2017
...Figure 2. (a) “IGS” belt attributed to John Graves Simcoe. The initial “I” indicates the formal “Ioannes.” Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution. (b) Road belt, now known commonly as a “Two Row” belt (reproduction). Courtesy of R. D. Hamell. (c) Algonquin Peace Tomahawk belt (detail). Courtesy of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2002) 49 (4): 821–869.
Published: 01 October 2002
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2003) 50 (3): 419–445.
Published: 01 July 2003
.... One card advertising the Warpath (Figure a) features a male Indian labeled ‘‘First American’’ with bow and arrows, tomahawk, and shield, but the remainder of the image (framed in a tomahawk outline) is English ships...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2005) 52 (4): 727–787.
Published: 01 October 2005
... Duncan 2000 “The Celebrated Madame Montour”: “Interpretress” across Early American Frontiers. Explorations in Early American Culture 4 : 81 -112. Holmes, William H. 1908 The Tomahawk. American Anthropologist 10 : 264 -76. Hulton, Paul, ed. 1984 America 1585: The Complete Drawings of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2003) 50 (3): 447–472.
Published: 01 July 2003
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2007) 54 (4): 697–722.
Published: 01 October 2007
... approached, bearing guns, bows and arrows, and tomahawks. Many of them wore American army uniforms, or parts of uniforms, given to the Osage during their 1804 visit to Washington. By wearing these gifts and carrying weapons, they signaled both their military and economic alli- ance with the United...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2012) 59 (2): 211–237.
Published: 01 April 2012
..., and content of messages and cue the oral reci- 226 Elizabeth Hill Boone Figure 10. Huron chief Nicholas Vincent Tsawanhonhi holds forth a wampum belt that refers to a tomahawk given to the Hurons by England’s George III. This lithograph...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2007) 54 (3): 407–443.
Published: 01 July 2007
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2001) 48 (3): 433–472.
Published: 01 July 2001
..., a peach-seed game, turtle-shell rattles, a walnut war club, 40 a tomahawk, some carvings, and a feather headdress. He also worked recording traditional songs, making records of Wyandot linguistics, and even managed to attend a ritual feast. As he...