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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 500–501.
Published: 01 July 2010
...​ but biased. Their accounts all too often general- ized about “Indians,” not recognizing the diversity and complexity of Native American cultures. Scholars, inclined to view traditional Native American religions in simplistic and static terms, have sometimes failed to appreciate the ongoing dynamic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 509–524.
Published: 01 October 2008
... Representation (in Both Senses of the Term) John M. Watanabe, Dartmouth College Abstract. This commentary addresses issues of representation in its delegative and political as well as sign-making senses intrinsic to bottom-up histories of state power and the meanings such power precipitates...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 467–495.
Published: 01 July 2014
...L. Antonio Curet The Taíno term and concept has traditionally been used as a designation of some form of cultural identity for the groups that occupied the Greater Antilles at the time of contact. This perspective assumes that these groups shared a cultural background because of a common ancestry...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 549–574.
Published: 01 July 2014
... peoples in terms of their seeking alliances and funding from outside allies, adapting institutions and social organization, and reconstructing self-representations for securing and managing their territories. Drawing from long-term research among the Kaiabi (Tupi-Guarani) indigenous people, we compare...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 693–719.
Published: 01 October 2013
... death was recast in terms of widespread solar myths that provided an overarching framework to explain the rise and fall of Mesoamerican rulers and cities. His fate was explained as an ineludible outcome that created the conditions for the advent of a new era, marked by the introduction of Christianity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (3): 407–443.
Published: 01 July 2007
... that the perceived disparity between native credulity and subsequent disenchantment is a function of misunderstandings and misinterpretations of the terminology employed. The native accounts never claimed the Europeans were gods in any Christian sense of the term. Instead, their words (in this case Manitou...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 395–421.
Published: 01 July 2009
...-evolutionary category “band” in terms of ethnie . Rethinking “bandness” in terms of ethnie promises more fruitful results from analyzing domestic-scale societies such as hunter-gatherer-fishers. Copyright 2009 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2009 ARCIA (Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 291–331.
Published: 01 April 2005
... the cultural assumptions underlying Euro-American notions of indigenousness , they have paid relatively little attention to the equally problematic concepts of environmentalism and conservation , and how use of these terms necessarily frames indigenous people's beliefs and values in Euro-North American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 727–787.
Published: 01 October 2005
...Marshall Joseph Becker The English term matchcoat derives from an Algonquian root word relating to clothing or dress in general. During the seventeenth century matchcoat came to refer to European-made units of woolen cloth,generally about two meters (a “fathom”) long, that were traded to natives...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 331–354.
Published: 01 April 2006
... methods for engaging and representing the past. Telling stories about the colonial period enabled Klallam people to frame traumatic cultural ruptures on their own terms. Two brief narratives analyzed here illustrate that such stories are not raw data to be turned into “real” history by Western academics...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 1–35.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., both materially and discursively, both in terms of the ecological networks that provide us with sustenance and the identities that define who we are as social, cultural, and historical beings. This article examines early contacts on the Northwest coast, using food as a lens on cultural...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 37–63.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., in the absence of extensive documentation on historical self-ascriptions, contemporary ethnohistorians examining upper Great Lakes fur trade settlements have attempted to come to terms with the historical social ontologies that long preceded official attempts to regulate them. Specifically, we examine...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (4): 683–726.
Published: 01 October 2011
... they represent new adaptations versus long-term continuities? And second, is it possible to access emic or internal perspectives on meanings behind governance, difference, and even change in order to illuminate Maya perspectives on the early colonial experience? The results highlight the intertwined nature...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 595–619.
Published: 01 October 2016
... realms. Such Native understandings of the sea are critical for indigenizing past landscapes often framed in Eurocentric terms. Moreover, the Shawnee narratives highlight the complex roles of storytelling in Native-newcomer relations and Shawnee intranational debates during a critical period when growing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 645–669.
Published: 01 October 2016
...Lasse Hölck Abstract This study examines the historical relationship between Comcáac foragers of Sonora, Mexico, and the Spanish/Mexican society between 1650 and 1850. To do so, the concept of trust is introduced, adapted for ethnohistorical research, and discussed as a frequent term in the primary...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 91–114.
Published: 01 January 2017
... enslavement, local limited-term enslavement, and forced relocation. Perhaps the most fascinating element of this saga is the degree to which English-allied native leaders worked to influence the treatment of surrenderers, helping them to escape to New York, harboring runaways, and in other ways trying to keep...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 621–645.
Published: 01 October 2018
... and political organization. Following Hal Langfur, we can term this general making of spaces a re-territorialization. Critical social relations include those between Amerindian ethnic entities and their leaders, soldiers, and missionaries. This article focuses on a key spatial relation between Amerindian...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 21–47.
Published: 01 January 2019
... area in what is now western Marin County as a refuge, the article examines the ethnohistorical evidence for long-term histories of indigenous persistence and strategic engagement with colonial peoples and processes. References Avery Christy . 2009 . Tomales Bay Environmental History...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 275–300.
Published: 01 April 2019
... the Upper Pilcomayo River produced a considerable amount of information, pointing to the long-term continuity of their presence in the region. The materials were less informative on cultural and social changes in their society through time. This study presents new insights on Toba bands trekking territories...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 667–688.
Published: 01 October 2019
... for other, non-ancestral ritual utilities. They have shifted from treating certain bones as a materialization of self to viewing bones in terms of the practical potentialities the bones encase, employing a mode of engagement exemplified by Tz’utujiil Maya bonesetters who treat broken bones with sacralized...