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tarascan

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 611–612.
Published: 01 July 2019
...Daniel Santana From Tribute to Communal Sovereignty: The Tarascan and Caxcan Territories in Transition . Edited by Andrew Roth-Seneff , Robert V. Kemper , and Julie Adkins . ( Tucson : University of Arizona Press , 2015 . viii +261 pp., foreword, acknowledgments, references...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 637–662.
Published: 01 October 2013
...David L. Haskell The recent translation and description of La memoria de don Melchor Caltzin , produced in 1543 and the earliest document written in the Tarascan (Purhépecha) language, opens an important window into the study of Tarascan historiography and state formation, which has generally been...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 733–737.
Published: 01 October 2003
... the reader that indeed there are pre- Tarascan archaeological remains worthy of research. One future objective should be gaining a better understanding of this region’s uncertain, perhaps largely independent relationship...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 739–764.
Published: 01 October 2012
... and unofficial interpreters to unravel the complexities of the behavior of Spanish men in predomi- nantly indigenous cultural contexts on the edges of the old Tarascan federa- tion in Michoacán. One way to examine how Spanish men adopted aspects of indigenous culture like language is through...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (4): 669–698.
Published: 01 October 2009
..., and by doing away with the onerous practices of tribute collection and repartimiento, or forced labor drafts. By the mid-sixteenth century, diverse ethnic groups had settled in the city and made it their home; among them were Tonalteca, Mexica, Caxcanes, Otomi, Tlaxcalans, Tetzcoca, and Tarascans...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 316–317.
Published: 01 April 2017
..., on the part of two indigenous groups that made up the multiethnic Tarascan state: the migrant Uanacaze, and the isleños who originated on the islands of Lake Pátzcuaro. Commissioned by the Spanish viceroy, supervised by a Franciscan friar, and authored by indigenous nobles and artists, it is one...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 684–685.
Published: 01 October 2018
.... Indeed, the volume’s examination of Christian concepts translated into Yucatec and K’iche’ Maya, Tarascan, Nahuatl, Quechua, Guarani, Tupi, and Chiquitano is one of its greatest strengths and contributions, allowing readers ample opportunity to compare strategies employed in the various regions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 675–690.
Published: 01 October 2012
... of the ancient Purépecha civilization, popularly known as the Tarascans. While the core area of the diocese was fairly uniformly made up of Tarascan speakers, the frontiers of the diocese included the wide multiplicity of languages seen in the southern region of the Archdiocese of Mexico, along...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 745–747.
Published: 01 October 2019
... from over a hundred communities of origin and included Tarascans, Nahuas, Otomis, Cocas, Tecuexes, and Cazcans among others. In many cases they had made stops along the way, through a variety of landscapes, contacts, and languages. How does this study fit into a larger narrative that has...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 171–172.
Published: 01 January 2015
... in the politics of memory comes to the forefront in the chapters of Hans Ros- kamp, examining Tarascan and Nahua memories of the foundation of Tzin- tzuntzan, and Bas van Doesburg, who compares three Oaxacan accounts to demonstrate how “the past has been put at the service of the present” to assist...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 737–739.
Published: 01 October 2003
... research spe- cialization is the Maya, so this area is well-represented in the dictionary. However, he also includes entries on other groups, such as the Tarascan 6999 ETHNOHISTORY / 50:4 / sheet 156 of and the Toltec, that are less well known...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 415–420.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., especially among elites, dictated the use of an international symbol system as an act of social legiti- mization. Finally, the section presenting nine case studies contains impor- tant new data reported from the Lake Patzcuaro basin in the Tarascan area, Morelos, and the Maya region of Chikinchel...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 795–801.
Published: 01 October 2013
..., and Criyincia in the Northern Bolivian Highlands 77 Demuth, Bathsheba. Law on the Land: Contesting Ethical Authority in the Western Arctic 469 Golovko, Evgeniy V. See Peter P. Schweitzer, Evgeniy V. Golovko, and Nikolai B. Vakhtin Haskell, David L. Tarascan Historicity: Narrative Structure...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 47–70.
Published: 01 January 2016
... surrounding the Spanish traza, forming barrios of Nahuas, Tonaltecos, Tlaxcalans, and Tarascans. In 1610 these indigenous clusters to the north and south of the city eventually fused into two Indian towns, Tlacuitlapan and Tonalá.46 Throughout the colonial period, the city’s population of ethnically...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 667–674.
Published: 01 October 2012
... in Postcontact Mexico,” is set in a multiethnic and overwhelmingly indigenous imperial periphery in the former Tarascan empire in the diocese of Michoacan, where Nahuatl served as a language for trade and colonial administration. Missionary priests, the protagonists of John F. Schwaller’s essay...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (3): 345–354.
Published: 01 July 2020
... triptyque aztèque de la crucifixion . Paris : Réunion des musées nationaux, Musée national de la Renaissance, Union latine . Feest Christian . 1990 . “ Vienna’s Mexican Treasures: Aztec, Mixtec, and Tarascan Works from 16th Century Austrian Collections .” Archiv für Völkerkunde 44 : 1 – 64...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 309–331.
Published: 01 April 2015
... longer life in that time was . . . that, ordinarily, they were made to do much corvée work [tequios]” (1985a: 205). In general, the RGs show that the belief that idleness endangered health was prevalent not only in the Nahua region (Burkhart 1989: 132) but in Zapotec (Antequera) and Tarascan...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 195–198.
Published: 01 January 2009
... relocation of many Tarascan Indians northward, where they worked in the emerging silver mines; but the Tarascan elite’s synthesis into Spanish culture via matrimony and economic investment helped contain lower-class discontent. Even though all the perti- nent variables are not apparent, we can see...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 199–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
... of Mexico retained their sacred connotations in the face of the new colonial order. In Pátzcuaro, the Spanish arrival meant the forced relocation of many Tarascan Indians northward, where they worked in the emerging silver mines; but the Tarascan elite’s synthesis into Spanish culture via matrimony...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 200–201.
Published: 01 January 2009
... relocation of many Tarascan Indians northward, where they worked in the emerging silver mines; but the Tarascan elite’s synthesis into Spanish culture via matrimony and economic investment helped contain lower-class discontent. Even though all the perti- nent variables are not apparent, we can see...