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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 836–838.
Published: 01 October 2000
... on textiles and costume, ethnohistory, or a myriad of other topics. An important part of this book is its lavish illustration. Textiles, mainly in the collections of the Textile Museum of Washington, are shown in excellent photographs with captions that point out the salient aspects of spinning...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
... with the activities that contribute to the making of cloth, which include spinning, preparing the threads for the loom (warping), and weaving on the backstrap loom. These conceptual ties span at least a millennium, as suggested by a recent analysis of almanacs from the Postclassic Maya codices, and are of special...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 766–767.
Published: 01 October 2016
... in the 1930s. Chapter 2 focuses on the uranium boom itself, while chapter 3 details the ramifications of Paddy Martinez’s famous uranium ore discovery in July 1950. Ironically, government and industry managed to spin his find in such a way as to make Navajos appear complicit in the uranium debacle. When...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 385–386.
Published: 01 April 2015
... Lenape community did so. Instead, they chose to live among the newly arrived English settlers. Freeman supported herself for most of her life by taking on wage labor—spinning and weaving flax, tend- ing swine, and performing medical services for her neighbors. The family maintained older patterns...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., nonnumerical information including, but not limited to, names, stories, and other accounts of Inka life histories and cultural traditions. 4 Given the broad diversity of construction features of the knotted strings (e.g., variations in cord spin and ply, knot direction, etc.), a question arises: what types...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 173–174.
Published: 01 January 2016
... available and accessible to the public. The NMAI has been criticized in the past for putting too positive a spin on things; displaying plenty of examples of indigenous cultural achievement and evidence of survival but pulling its punches on the devastation and brutality of invasion, settler colonialism...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 789–790.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 791–792.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 792–795.
Published: 01 October 2005
...- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation received for their efforts...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 795–796.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 796–798.
Published: 01 October 2005
...- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation received for their efforts...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 798–799.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 800–801.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 801–802.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 803–804.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 804–805.
Published: 01 October 2005
... to transform a devalued re- source into a marketable product was, however, undervalued by the reser- vation traders—frequently netting the women less than three cents an hour for time spent painstakingly carding, spinning, and weaving (126–27).Thus began a cycle whereby, due to the low compensation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 9–34.
Published: 01 January 2007
... there were many men and women. Thus there, with the heat, they illicitly used [each other]: men with women, women with men, and men with men. And in Mexico they had men dressed in women’s clothes who were sodomites [sométicos] and performed the offices of women, such as spinning...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 701–723.
Published: 01 October 2004
... traditional ways of doing things rather than identifying particular indi- viduals by race. In 1801, Choctaw chief Homastubby, for example, asked Benjamin Hawkins to send women to teach them to spin and weave: ‘‘these women may go first among our halfbreeds and teach them wehave halfbreeds and others...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (4): 761–784.
Published: 01 October 2014
... worker” suggests that the trucker from Ashland, Oregon, had presumed to spin a naively speculative tale, generating no new “facts” of his own and making selective appropriations of facts generated by others. In this reaction, we might read A Tale of Two Mayan Babels...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 101–124.
Published: 01 January 2013
... for, and harvesting crops, women did domestic chores—preparing the food and caring for the children. Other tasks included raising ducks, transport- ing water, making pottery, spinning cotton, and weaving baskets and ham- mocks.6 The women also collected wild fruit, roots, grubs, and honey in the forest.7 Most...