1-20 of 315 Search Results for

sovereign

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (3): 351–353.
Published: 01 July 2022
...Justin Estreicher Focusing on the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) and their homeland, the Qualla Boundary in North Carolina, Courtney Lewis’s Sovereign Entrepreneurs addresses a striking lack of ethnographic research on Native American small-business owners. More importantly...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (4): 553–554.
Published: 01 October 2021
...John R. Legg The Last Sovereigns: Sitting Bull and the Resistance of the Free Lakotas . By Robert M. Utley ( Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press , 2020 . 200 pp., photographs, illustrations, maps, index. $24.95 hardcover.). Copyright 2021 by American Society for Ethnohistory...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 51–85.
Published: 01 January 2008
...Isabel Yaya Among all the Inca sovereigns whose memory had been preserved by the Spanish chroniclers, Yahuar Huacac holds a unique position. He is famed for having shed tears of blood as a child when a foreign lord kidnapped and maltreated him. Surprisingly, his sufferings ended with matrimonial...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 January 2019
... in the opportunity to develop one’s “full potential” as an American citizen. This language signaled a hybrid political identity: sovereign Indigenous peoples with a unique contribution to make to America, who as Arizonans were entitled to participate in post–World War II prosperity as equal citizens. Copyright...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 469–495.
Published: 01 July 2015
... a distinctive style to record sovereign political and financial affairs, an example of the Mesoamerican emphasis on authority—the ability to inscribe and draw upon and mobilize relevance and meaning—as the foundation for creating and maintaining a lettered polity. Copyright 2015 by American Society...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 293–321.
Published: 01 April 2012
... city” that was “scientifically discovered” by Bingham. The expedition combined a reliance on prospecting by local huaqueros with the notion that science had a sovereign claim on those objects that might contribute to the accumulation of its knowledge. Ultimately, the re-visioning of Machu Picchu...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 247–267.
Published: 01 April 2018
..., as a sovereign nation, stood legally on an equal footing with the United States, and that the treaties had been made between sovereign governments (Peters 1831 : 5–7). After Jackson came to office, the federal government effectively refused to abide by the treaties and to enforce the Cherokee’s treaty rights...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 13–30.
Published: 01 April 2001
... identity. There were only two castes, because slaves were considered as children and not taken into consideration. Slaves did not even have the ‘‘privilege’’ of making the mifaly (act of allegiance) to the sovereign. Having...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (2): 271–291.
Published: 01 April 2024
... territory, though different from other sovereign states, fits into the category of a sovereign community. Bruyneel’s ( 2007 : xvii) study of Indigenous resistance falls into what he calls the “third space of sovereignty” where Indigenous political activists do not operate within or outside of the American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 171–204.
Published: 01 April 2001
..., Esoavelomandroso explains that ‘‘it is [above all] in respect of the folohazomanga [elided] that the mpanjaka mitan-dily 9 [sovereign] of the Menarandra exercises the functions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 173–174.
Published: 01 January 2016
... to the kind of bilateral relationship envisioned in the treaties negotiated in early America by sovereign entities whose power was more equally balanced, when Ethnohistory 63:1 (January 2016) doi 10.1215/00141801-3135386 Copyright 2016 by American Society for Ethnohistory 174...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 215–236.
Published: 01 April 2021
.... These treaties, which were more than tools of dispossession, enfolded and extended aadizookanag in agreements that embodied sovereign Ojibwe relationships with land, language, sacred history, ceremony, and kin. Federal and state policy makers, fueled by the desire for Indian land and resources, attempted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (2): 371.
Published: 01 April 2007
... in Oklahoma today are sovereign, self-governing nations whose presence in the state is evidence of the ability of tribal/cultural identity to transcend removal from homelands and the vagaries of federal assimilation policy. We particularly invite proposals that address the theme of the persistence...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (4): 547–548.
Published: 01 October 2021
... protecting (at least in name) the sovereign rights of the Six Nations toward attempts to ‘civilize’ and integrate them and their lands into the fabric of Upper Canada” (190). With a provision to replace hereditary leadership with an elected council, the Indian Act of 1869 embodied this shift toward...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 October 2017
... on a specific musical instrument: the Hawaiian steel guitar, or kīkā kila. By employing kīkā kila as a case study, the book sheds light on the history and politics of Hawai‘i, from sovereign kingdom to fiftieth state, and the dramatic way in which an obscure, local musical tradition became fundamental...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 205–206.
Published: 01 January 2019
... as an intruder in Indian Territory gave him access to land that would become the basis for the community of Brownsville. Brown’s life encapsulates multiple strands of the westward migration story: Indian Territory as a separate, sovereign location in which Americans were foreigners or intruders; American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 759–760.
Published: 01 October 2019
... opposed expectations of their place in it. Harper claims that Native peoples remained a recognized component within the new American polity, an analysis that seems to rely on present-day legal understandings of Native nations as third sovereign spaces. This assessment seems dubious; the immediate reality...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (4): 562–563.
Published: 01 October 2023
... in the upper Midwest with recent tragedies in the United States. Referencing the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson and George Floyd in Minneapolis alongside sovereign struggles on the Standing Rock reservation, Witgen gestures at the long legacies of this formative national scheme that continue to shape race...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 361–362.
Published: 01 April 2021
... between the last Inca sovereigns, Spanish colonizers of various stripes, and other Indigenous groups throughout this rugged eastern Andean enclave. The volume consists of two short, densely detailed chapters of historical narrative, and five sections with English translations of early Spanish colonial...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (4): 551–553.
Published: 01 October 2023
... after 1846—the year that the Supreme Court of Canada declared as the “effective date” for British sovereignty in British Columbia. Foster argues that the legal precedent of sovereign immunity—meaning that a citizen, Indigenous or non-Indigenous, could not sue the Crown without the Crown’s permission...