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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 185–188.
Published: 01 January 2019
... of Cuernavaca in the colonial period, based primarily on Nahuatl-language archival records. In the same year, Louise Burkhart ( 1988 ) wrote on the Christian-Nahua concept of the solar Christ. I think that each of the last three articles deserves recognition for employing new approaches to the study of changes...
Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 4. Ownership of solar house lot properties among three communities near Metepec Figure 4. Ownership of solar house lot properties among three communities near Metepec More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 161–189.
Published: 01 January 2003
...,drastically altering the ethnic distribution within this community. Inflated local property values triggered a real estate market in which the resident landholding Creole elite purchased and sold solares , or“household compounds,” largely among themselves as these became the primary indicators of one's...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 201–202.
Published: 01 January 2012
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 467–470.
Published: 01 July 2010
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 212–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 784–786.
Published: 01 October 2013
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (3): 383–406.
Published: 01 July 2020
...Allison Caplan Abstract Previous studies suggest that late postclassic and early colonial Nahua viewers understood specific artistic creations to contain tonalli , a solar-derived animating force. This article advances understanding of the animacy of Nahua featherworks by examining attention...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 693–719.
Published: 01 October 2013
... death was recast in terms of widespread solar myths that provided an overarching framework to explain the rise and fall of Mesoamerican rulers and cities. His fate was explained as an ineludible outcome that created the conditions for the advent of a new era, marked by the introduction of Christianity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 297–322.
Published: 01 April 2018
...Figure 4. Ownership of solar house lot properties among three communities near Metepec Figure 4. Ownership of solar house lot properties among three communities near Metepec ...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (3): 429–453.
Published: 01 July 2020
... are illustrated with images that carry crucial information connecting the stories of Huitzilopochtli and the hummingbird. Ultimately, in the illustration of the eagle-hawk, Huitzilopochtli recovers his hummingbird disguise and is presented as an avian-human deity with strong solar associations...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 191–220.
Published: 01 January 2003
... livestock corrals, and quintas (elite residential buildings grouped in a house lot or solar; the most elaborate masonry building faced the street). Wattle and daub construction was predominant in residential structures both...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 421–428.
Published: 01 April 2004
... traditional scholarship in many respects, Milbrath is no advocate of ‘‘the timeless Maya’’ and emphasizes the fact that solar references, closely linked with divine rulership, ‘‘faded fromview58)bya.d. 1000, to be replaced by the annual festival cal- endar. Likewise, lunar imagery of the Classic period...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 567–593.
Published: 01 July 2006
... to bear with me as I sketch a brief, generalized outline, because my path is longer and more circuitous than I first envisioned.8 Solar and Lunar Cycles In many ways the strongest impression of temporality in the ethnography of traditional native North America is of natural temporal cycles. Native...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 229–250.
Published: 01 April 2008
... the creation and destruction of the four suns, or eras, which preceded the birth of the fifth and present sun.6 The date 12 Reed is identified as the name of the first year of the second solar era. This is problematic because each solar era drew its name from the name of the year in which...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 437–464.
Published: 01 July 2019
... ). Although colonial commentators state that such khipus registered astronomical observations and calendrical data in the form of solar years, lunar and solar months, days, and other cycles, they do not tell us exactly how (Calancha 1638 : bk. 1, chap. 14; Guaman Poma 1992 : 898; Gutiérrez de Santa Clara...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 683–706.
Published: 01 October 2015
... the course of the 365-­day solar calendar. The veintena section contains a wealth of pictorial information about the annual ceremonies. Indeed, because of its extensive imagery, early date, and indigenous authorship, scholars have often posi- tioned the Codex Borbonicus as the authoritative source...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 445–448.
Published: 01 April 2004
.... Touched by the sun, Bau- dez sees solar cycles everywhere, along with the ‘‘moist’’ and ‘‘dry earth which supernatural images (the ‘‘deities’’ Baudez eschews) embody in per- sonalized form. Beings with ‘‘short noses’’ correspond to the sun; those with long noses, to the ‘‘moist underworld...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 448–450.
Published: 01 April 2004
.... Touched by the sun, Bau- dez sees solar cycles everywhere, along with the ‘‘moist’’ and ‘‘dry earth which supernatural images (the ‘‘deities’’ Baudez eschews) embody in per- sonalized form. Beings with ‘‘short noses’’ correspond to the sun; those with long noses, to the ‘‘moist underworld...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 450–453.
Published: 01 April 2004
.... Touched by the sun, Bau- dez sees solar cycles everywhere, along with the ‘‘moist’’ and ‘‘dry earth which supernatural images (the ‘‘deities’’ Baudez eschews) embody in per- sonalized form. Beings with ‘‘short noses’’ correspond to the sun; those with long noses, to the ‘‘moist underworld...