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smallpox

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2002) 49 (4): 821–869.
Published: 01 October 2002
...Hilary M. Carey; David Roberts Of all the various infections that afflicted Aboriginal people in Australia during the years of first contact with Europeans, smallpox was the most disastrous. The physical and social impacts of the disease are well known. This article considers another effect of the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2004) 51 (1): 45–71.
Published: 01 January 2004
... tribal customs as well as their leadership position. American Society for Ethnohistory 2004 Avoiding the Smallpox Spirits: Colonial Epidemics and Southeastern Indian Survival Paul Kelton, University of Kansas Abstract. Current scholarship on the impact of epidemics on American Indians is...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2016) 63 (2): 423–424.
Published: 01 April 2016
... important than the Cherokee response to smallpox, which undermines the narrative of Native peoples as passive victims who failed to cope with the epidemiological catastrophe or as those who even amplified the lethality of smallpox through “counterproductive actions” like failing to separate the sick from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2013) 60 (3): 485–504.
Published: 01 July 2013
..., the Dena'ina contextualized the turmoil not as the oppressive actions of invaders but as shaman-induced intracultural turmoil, thereby shaping the narrative in their own historical terms and negating the power of the occupier to frame history. Third, after the 1836–40 smallpox epidemic, many Dena'ina...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2014) 61 (4): 607–618.
Published: 01 October 2014
... smallpox before he could complete his task. Two hundred seventy years later, the Mohegan Tribe, with the help of Elizabeth II, unveiled a monument to Mahomet at Southwark Cathedral. Oscillating between his story and wider questions related to monument, memory, and commemoration, this short essay argues for...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2018) 65 (1): 101–127.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Chris Arnett; Jesse Morin Abstract This article argues that the red-ocher paintings (pictographs) in Coast Salish Tsleil-Waututh territory in Indian Arm, British Columbia, were made around the time of contact in specific response to demographic collapse caused by smallpox. Tsleil-Waututh people...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2001) 48 (3): 518–519.
Published: 01 July 2001
... spread of the most serious epidemics and chronic afflic- tions: smallpox, venereal diseases, and tuberculosis (the latter Boyd argues were indigenous to the Americas but were introduced as new variants to the Northwest Coast with the arrival of Europeans), malaria, smallpox again along with dysentery...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2002) 49 (1): 171–204.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Smallpox in the Greater Southwest, American Anthropologist 89 (3): 704 -8. Reiter, Paul 1938 The Jemez Pueblo of Unshagi,New Mexico . Monographs of the School of American Research, No. 5-6. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. Robinson, William J., J. W. Hannah, and B. G. Harrill 1972...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2016) 63 (2): 441–442.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., infectious diseases, and slave resistance and rebellion. Epidemics of yellow fever, cholera, and smallpox, often associated with the arrival of human cargoes, recurred in Cuba and Brazil in the nineteenth century. Graden argues that the human toll and the anxiety over contagion heightened criticism of the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2019) 66 (3): 618–619.
Published: 01 July 2019
... present-day sensibilities, and Few’s chosen spotlights—on epidemic death (chapter 1), typhus (chapter 2), postmortem cesareans (chapter 3), inoculation (chapter 4), and the smallpox vaccine (chapter 5)—are not meant to cover medical practices exhaustively; rather, they reflect what is available in the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2014) 61 (3): 391–418.
Published: 01 July 2014
...-reservation­ period. Comanche population, however, decreased steadily after 1780, experiencing an aston- ishing collapse during the second half of the nineteenth century (see fig. 2). Comanche population decline was largely the result of a succession of smallpox and cholera epidemics documented...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 January 2005
..., the horrific morbidity and mortality rates for native American peoples in the aftermath of European conquest. Alchon critiques the idea of ‘‘New World exceptionalism’’ regarding epidemic disease, the idea that smallpox, measles, and the bubonic plague had a more catastrophic effect on native...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 198–200.
Published: 01 January 2005
... explanations for, the horrific morbidity and mortality rates for native American peoples in the aftermath of European conquest. Alchon critiques the idea of ‘‘New World exceptionalism’’ regarding epidemic disease, the idea that smallpox, measles, and the bubonic plague had a more catastrophic effect on...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 200–201.
Published: 01 January 2005
..., the horrific morbidity and mortality rates for native American peoples in the aftermath of European conquest. Alchon critiques the idea of ‘‘New World exceptionalism’’ regarding epidemic disease, the idea that smallpox, measles, and the bubonic plague had a more catastrophic effect on native...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2007) 54 (3): 473–508.
Published: 01 July 2007
... America. William and Mary Quarterly 33 : 289 -99. Dary, David 1973 The Buffalo in Kansas. Kansas Historical Quarterly 39 : 305 -44. Dollar, Clyde D. 1977 The High Plains Smallpox Epidemic of 1837-38. Western Historical Quarterly 8 : 15 -38. Dorsey, James O. 1885 Mourning and War...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2001) 48 (3): 519–521.
Published: 01 July 2001
... also recounts how traditional remedies failed to defeat these new diseases. Especially dangerous was the customary healing practice of taking a sweat followed by a cold bath, a basic cure for so many other ailments but a fatal response to smallpox. A third aspect to the spread of disease was...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2002) 49 (3): 507–543.
Published: 01 July 2002
... Teológicos de la Amazonía. Barclay, F., and F. Santos-Granero 1980 La conformación de las Comunidades Amuesha (La legalización de un despojo territorial). Amazonía Peruana 3 (5): 43 -74. Barquet, N., and P. Domingo 1997 Smallpox: The Triumph over the Most Terrible of the Ministers of Death...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2002) 49 (1): 123–169.
Published: 01 January 2002
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2002) 49 (1): 69–121.
Published: 01 January 2002
..., Northeastern California: Archaeological Investigations at Lake Britton, Pit 3, 4, and 5 Project . James H. Cleland, ed. Vol. 1 , pp. 15 -29. San Francisco,ca: kea Environmental. Clark, Stephen M. 1981 Smallpox and the Iroquois Wars:An Ethnohistorical Study of the Influence of Disease and Demographic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2000) 47 (2): 469–481.
Published: 01 April 2000
... grew from approximately ten thousand to seventy-five thousand. In addition, Trennert noted that in the nineteenth century, tribal members readily agreed to smallpox vaccination, and in the twentieth century, Navajo women...