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skirt

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 229–250.
Published: 01 April 2008
...Cecelia F. Klein Most scholars, citing a passage in the sixteenth-century Florentine Codex by Bernardino de Sahagún ( 1950–82 ), have interpreted the famous Aztec stone statue known as Coatlicue, “Snakes-Her-Skirt,” as a reference to that goddess's role as the mother of the Aztec patron deity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (4): 517–548.
Published: 01 October 2023
.... Then, outside the Itztapalapa Peninsula, these peoples would have had three options. The first was heading north to continue toward the Mezquital Valley or skirting the Sierra Nevada to walk east. The second was crossing the Sierra Nevada through the strait between Iztaccihuatl and Monte Tlaloc. And the third...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 155–156.
Published: 01 January 2021
... of Panquilma), but most recurrent in the volume is a focus on how ritual spaces and practices are embedded in and constitutive of power relations. Notably, contributing authors are not bound by a single definition of ritual. While some readers may find this to be skirting a significant issue, the lack...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 348–349.
Published: 01 April 2021
... themes while providing fodder to careful historians. The decision to choose Indigenous women residing beyond the reservation was an astute one, given Jagodinsky’s borderlands approach. As the author argues, such protagonists skirted federal Indian laws and therefore resided in “legal borderlands...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
... and the extraction of honey from their hives. 20 All of these are activities attributed to midwives in the ethnographic and ethnohistoric literature. They hold skirts (note that the skirt is folded in the first frame), and the hieroglyphic captions refer to their act of receiving the skirts ( u k’am u pik...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 623–645.
Published: 01 October 2019
..., ‘Snakes-Her-Skirt.’ ” Ethnohistory 55 , no. 2 : 229 – 50 . Klein Janice . 1978 . “ Susto : The Anthropological Study of Diseases of Adaptation .” Social Science and Medicine 12 : 23 – 28 . Lemley Megan , and Spies Lori A. 2015 . “ Traditional Beliefs and Practices...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 51–72.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., and that the captain (Cortés) will see the gold someday.10 The Mexica leaders struggle to make sense of Cortés’s relentless search for gold. The Cihuacoatl even suggests that perhaps some little woman (cihua- tzintli) pocketed the gold or, literally, “skirted it” (ipan mocueti). The Span- ish translation refers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 553–572.
Published: 01 July 2015
... the designs of their home com- munities. The constellation of designs in a huipil and its accompanying skirt (corte/uq) identifies the town of origin, while the artistry provides the weaver’s signature. At a higher level of analysis, linguistic groups are iden- tifiable by the symbols shared among...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 489–533.
Published: 01 July 2004
... believed they had ‘‘womanly desires for men ‘‘dressed in skirts and ‘‘were like women He repudiated machi weye, who were thought to enjoy being penetrated by men, as ‘‘sodomites In turn, he consid- ered Reche ‘‘sodomites ‘‘gender inverts and ‘‘effeminates’’ and thought them to be ‘‘devil worshipers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 119–143.
Published: 01 January 2015
... (Urbana News-­Gazette 1967). UI built upon this angle and dressed Idelle in the head- dress that previous Chief Illiniweks had worn and the fringed leather shirt and gloves that were part of the costume. Below the waist, however, they feminized/sexualized her by having her wear a leather skirt...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 669–695.
Published: 01 October 2007
... them “disgusting creatures,” they were “devoid of shame or decency.”49 Even when Chinookan women were dressed, Western observers frequently complained of their “nakedness.” Where Anglo women were stifled under layers of linens, woolens, and contorting stays, Chinookan women wore only skirts...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 713–738.
Published: 01 October 2012
... Interpretation of the Aztec Statue Called Coatlicue, ‘Snakes-­Her-­Skirt Ethnohistory 55 (2008): 229–50. 62 Cecelia F. Klein, “The Devil and the Skirt,” Ancient Mesoamerica 11 (2000): 1–26; Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures, s.v. “The Devil.” 63 Burkhart, Slippery Earth, 40–41...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 101–111.
Published: 01 January 2000
..., and the horn of the rhinoceros beetle for nose decoration. She gave to the women the female body fluids and menstruation, the grass skirt, the string 2 cotton to make net bags (tulip), a kind...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 129–157.
Published: 01 January 2007
... is of particular interest because it spoke to the uncertainties of gender and caste, while also blurring the secular and sacred divide. Thus Span- iards were allowed to wear one kind of cape and Indians another; men donned cloaks (mantos), women used shawls (mantas); men did not wear skirts...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 337–350.
Published: 01 April 2001
... discourse. Yet this response skirts the problematics of identity and 6326 Ethnohistory 48:1/2 / sheet 353 of 384 authenticity. Who decides who is an Indian? The scholar, the Indian, or the Indian who is a scholar who goes out and finds Indians? Far more impor...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 727–787.
Published: 01 October 2005
... that the Proto-Algonquian (PA) term *ako:tay signi- fied skirt, or women’s garb, and that this word has elements that survive in the modern Ojibwa term majigoode dress’’ as in garment or costume, earlier specifically a skirt or petticoat). Goddard suggests that the English usage of the term matchcoat came from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 269–284.
Published: 01 April 2009
... to go right square into where the enemy was the thick- est. If we hadn’t of found out then we would have walked right into them. But we managed. We skirted around to the left and outflanked them from the left. The other two squads went around the same way. . . . We bypassed them...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 479–481.
Published: 01 April 2005
... of the Americas often skirt the examination of Christianity’s influence on culture, treating introduced religion as an external imposition that obscures the true object of inquiry. Opposing that approach in his history of two hundred years of Russian Orthodox pres- ence in Southeast Alaska, Sergei Kan asserts...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 481–483.
Published: 01 April 2005
... of Washington Press,1999. xxxi + 665 pp., 26 illustrations, appendix, notes, bibliography, index. $60.00 cloth.) Andie Diane Palmer, University of Alberta In the tradition of salvage or memory ethnography, ethnographic descrip- tions of indigenous peoples of the Americas often skirt the examination...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 483–485.
Published: 01 April 2005
... of the Americas often skirt the examination of Christianity’s influence on culture, treating introduced religion as an external imposition that obscures the true object of inquiry. Opposing that approach in his history of two hundred years of Russian Orthodox pres- ence in Southeast Alaska, Sergei Kan asserts...