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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 525–548.
Published: 01 July 2014
... to imagine that traditional indigenous territories often coincided with old rubber outposts, derelict haciendas , missionary stations, and abandoned oil camps. Nor did researchers envision the maelstrom that had taken place fifty years earlier, when native families were forced to collect rubber throughout...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 750–752.
Published: 01 October 2019
... South America” (5). The result is only partly successful. While rubber collection was still a living memory, very few researchers recorded the kind of systematic oral histories that would have provided richer sources. Inevitably, key episodes in Tasorentsi’s life—as a debt peon, slave raider...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 338–339.
Published: 01 April 2018
...Robert Wasserstrom Indigenous Agency in the Amazon: The Mojos in Liberal and Rubber-Boom Bolivia, 1842–1932 . By Van Valen Gary . ( Tucson : University of Arizona Press , 2013 . 250 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, notes, glossary, bibliography, index . $55.00 cloth...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 421–444.
Published: 01 July 2011
...Robert Wasserstrom; Susan Reider; Rommel Lara Alternately hunted and ignored while they were alive, the Tetete were a small group of Western Tucanoan speakers living in the Amazonian borderlands between Ecuador and Colombia. From 1877 through the 1920s, Ecuadorian rubber collectors shot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 755–766.
Published: 01 October 2000
...Seth Garfield American Society for Ethnohistory 2000 Review Essays Recent Works on Amazonian Indians Seth Garfield, Bowdoin College Red Rubber, Bleeding Trees: Violence, Slavery, and Empire in Northwest Amazonia, By Michael Edward Stanfield. (Albuquerque: Uni- versity of New...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 731–746.
Published: 01 October 2000
... to demonize the Ye’kuana as enslavers of the Yanomama, it is impor- tant to emphasize that peaceful relations have prevailed between the two peoples for half a century. Nelly Arvelo-Jiménez The Rubber Boom Threatens Cultural Continuity ss) The social...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 381–401.
Published: 01 July 2001
... and fish- ing. Early in the twentieth century, Kayabi communities were located along the Peixes and Teles Pires Rivers (tributaries of the Tapajós River) in the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Pará. During the past four decades, however, with the influx of rubber tappers, miners, ranchers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 January 2018
... they were expelled from Ecuador and Peru, they had founded seventy-four missions. “Until a few decades ago,” begins María Susana Cipolletti in her fascinating book, “it was generally assumed that cultural change came late to lowland South America, during the Rubber Boom [1875–1930]. Thus native...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 393–394.
Published: 01 April 2015
..., Europeans learned about rubber processing, terrace farming, the suspension bridge, the canoe and kayak, 394 Book Reviews and barbeque. The movement of information, material, and technology was multidirectional; Europeans brought west horses, cloth...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 550–552.
Published: 01 July 2001
... to ambitious headmen and war leaders by the Spanish mission- aries, rubber barons, coffee growers, and modern-day Peruvian agencies against the forces of resistance, including ideological ones. Strathern’s dis- cussion of the resurgent blood revenge among the Mount Hagen tribes, characterized...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 552–555.
Published: 01 July 2001
... and war leaders by the Spanish mission- aries, rubber barons, coffee growers, and modern-day Peruvian agencies against the forces of resistance, including ideological ones. Strathern’s dis- cussion of the resurgent blood revenge among the Mount Hagen tribes, characterized by the increasing use...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 549–574.
Published: 01 July 2014
... their previous contact with 556 Simone Athayde and Marianne Schmink rubber tappers and their work with the Villas-Bôas­ brothers, the Kaiabi acquired valuable social skills. In addition to learning Portuguese, some men received formal education in FUNAI’s school...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (4): 805–810.
Published: 01 October 2014
... Commemorations 607 Tovías, Blanca. The Right to Possess Memory: Winter Counts of the Blackfoot, 1830–­1937 99 Wasserstrom, Robert. Surviving the Rubber Boom: Cofán and Siona Society in the Colombia-­Ecuador Borderlands (1875–­1955) 525 Williams, Linda K. The Birth of the Virgin with Saint...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 761–765.
Published: 01 October 2003
...- nous peoples in the first half of the nineteenth century I have seen. He also discusses at length the ‘‘holocaust’’ of the rubber boom at the end of the nineteenth century and in the early twentieth century. Xavier Albó exam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 705–729.
Published: 01 October 2000
..., were able to gain legal title to vast tracts of land. With the expansion of extractive industries such as rubber and sarra- pia (tonka bean) (Dipteryx sp at the close of the nineteenth century and into the early part of the twentieth century many indigenous communities in the Venezuelan Amazon were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 141–162.
Published: 01 January 2012
... ): 191 – 211 . Reeve Mary-Elizabeth 1988a Los Quichuas del Curaray: El proceso de formación de la identidad . Quito : Abya-Yala . 1988b Cauchu Uras: Lowland Quichua Histories of the Amazon Rubber Boom . In Rethinking History and Myth: Indigenous South American Perspectives...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 747–754.
Published: 01 October 2000
...-raiding and land invasions by the Sanuma, an indigenous people living immedi- ately south of Ye’kuana lands. A period of warfare lasted until the s, when the Ye’kuana made peace with the Sanuma and allowed them to settle in their territory. The regime of forced labor during the rubber boom also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 87–121.
Published: 01 April 2001
... the island’s southern landscape from their ships, noticed prickly pear growing within an extensive area as village and cropped land enclosures as far back as 1819 (Decary 1934: 49, 1939: 156). Buyers of rubber, cattle...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 683–706.
Published: 01 October 2015
..., is like no other pictorialization of that month and differs substantially from the descriptions in most texts (fig. 3). Here is a group of pilgrims, some bearing children on their backs, who carry offerings including food, bundles of wood, and paper objects spattered with rubber. They approach...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 537–547.
Published: 01 October 2018
... nineteenth century as rubber extraction and agriculture grew and border disputes were settled by diplomatic efforts. Our contention is that this historical characterization of the refuge zone flattens out myriad indigenous experiences and makes the state and nonindigenous actors appear as though...