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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 793–797.
Published: 01 October 2004
... Community. M.A. thesis , Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. Response to Campisi and Starns Dave Davis, University of Southern Maine When I submitted ‘‘A Case of Identity: Ethnogenesis of the New Houma Indians’’ to Ethnohistory, my only concern was that its publication might provoke...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 393–398.
Published: 01 April 2006
... of the Indigenous Caribbean. Proceedings of the British Academy 81 : 37 -66. Missing the Point and an Illuminating Example: A Response to Keegan’s Comments L. Antonio Curet, Field Museum of Natural History [The Mirror of Erised] shows us nothing more or less than the deepest, most...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 321–330.
Published: 01 April 2008
..., and Oromo Nationalism: A Response to Aneesa Kassam Günther Schlee, Max Planck Institute In a recent issue of Ethnohistory, Aneesa Kassam put forth an argument about the origins of the Gabra that she claims is at odds with my 1989 monograph, Identities on the Move. In what follows, I...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 491–523.
Published: 01 July 2011
... identities in the late-colonial era were more flexible, adaptable, and informal than either tribally focused colonial ethnographies or the scholarly literature on identity formation would suggest. Copyright 2011 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2011 Local Responses to the Ethnic Geography...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 1.
Published: 01 January 2024
... on many aspects of life. It has shaped cultural, political, and economic experiences around the world. Indigenous people are well aware of the catastrophic results and at times creative responses to disease and community crisis. Scholars have taken note of the many ways the spread of diseases...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 87–112.
Published: 01 January 2024
... of a myriad of responses on the part of Indigenous people to this particular epidemic threat and the attendant public health interventions introduced by Spanish colonial authorities, including the smallpox vaccine. Other responses included less visible acts of refusal. Some parents who resisted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 415–444.
Published: 01 July 2010
...Jonathan Truitt Using Spanish- and Nahuatl-language sources, this article examines the interaction of Nahua women in Mexico City with the Catholic Church. By examining Nahua women's role in colonial Christianity—their religiosity (as admired by European and indigenous chroniclers), responsibilities...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 293–321.
Published: 01 April 2011
... by the mytho-historical content of the better-known indigenous text, the Popol Vuh. Although the títulos were created for territorial disputes and claims to rights before the Spanish legal system, they also represented Maya-K’iche’ responses to colonial domination and reveal how the Maya K’iche’ perceived...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 45–71.
Published: 01 January 2004
.... This article,however, examines the response of Southeastern Indians to disease and shows that Native Americans were capable of successfully retarding mortality rates and curtailing the spread of contagions. Through their innovative responses to epidemiological crises, spiritual leaders reinforced tribal...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 63–86.
Published: 01 January 2024
... arrived at acceptable contingency plans when faced with illness and argues that community responses to smallpox helped ease factional tensions. Iksa (moiety) obligations for funeral rites—embodying the notion of iyyi kowa (generosity)—bridged political differences, accounting for a period of collaboration...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 101–111.
Published: 01 January 2000
...Lorenzo Brutti This article explains millenarism as a cultural response to a range of social, economic, and ecological changes that occurred during the past few centuries in Oksapmin society. The assumption is that Oksapmin cosmology has always been dynamic and self-innovating toward both...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 669–704.
Published: 01 October 2000
... of the sixteenth century. Also explored are the responses of the indigenous societies in their process of change into what are now known as criollo peasant communities. The article's conclusion is that this cultural transformation has not yet ended. American Society for Ethnohistory 2000 Acosta Saignes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 705–729.
Published: 01 October 2000
..., as manifested in attitudes of aperture and resistance that emerged under different historical conditions and that are clearly expressed in the distribution and modes of burial practice. Funerary remains serve as indicators of the changes in cultural response to the contact situation, and as such they have...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 473–494.
Published: 01 July 2001
... Americans, and some Native Americans, none of whom are known to have been Houmas. The genesis of the modern group's identity as Houma Indians can be understood as a response to legally sanctioned racial classifications and race discrimination in Louisiana from the late nineteenth century on. American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (1): 69–121.
Published: 01 January 2002
... of irrefutable proof that exotic pestilence was transmitted to California after the Columbian landfall but before foreign settlement is, in part, responsible for this lack of recognition. This article scrutinizes many varied lines of evidence that are interpreted as strong indicators of premission pestilence...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 163–185.
Published: 01 January 2009
... a practice of topographic memory that relies on the perspective of earth, sky, and underworld afforded by the moving, perceiving, conscious, and responsive person. Understood in this way, the listing of place-names is a form of cartographic imagination that incorporates history, geography, astronomy, ethics...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 183–199.
Published: 01 April 2010
... that are experimenting with new community gardens and other innovative responses to rapid ecological, climatic, and socioeconomic change. American Society for Ethnohistory 2010 Outpost Gardening in Interior Alaska: Food System Innovation and the Alaska Native Gardens of the 1930s through the 1970s Philip...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 709–739.
Published: 01 October 2010
... as primary textual sources from the Postclassic through Colonial periods written in Maya and Spanish, we document the transformation of pre-Hispanic Maya tree symbolism in response to contemporaneous European Christian myth and cosmology. We argue that, though having roots in pre-Hispanic iconography...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 259–278.
Published: 01 July 2023
... to determine individual status as well as one’s ability to fulfill community responsibilities. It also shaped notions of gender, revealing how dependence on important, yet unstable, goods could threaten traditional Creek conceptions of masculine leadership. Gunpowder, therefore, illuminates the ways in which...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 351–384.
Published: 01 July 2023
... to the Americas, including a request for “paintings” of the urban and natural landscape, without much detail on the project’s guidelines. The varied responses sent back to Spain are known as the Relaciones Geográficas de Indias. This essay investigates the cultural negotiations and potential for Indigenous...
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