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regional network

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 621–645.
Published: 01 October 2018
...Mark Harris Abstract Building on Neil Whitehead’s work in northern South America, this article considers the formations of two different deep-forest regional networks. Though these Amerindian spaces have origins in the precolonial past, this article analyses their shaping in the seventeenth...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 655–687.
Published: 01 October 2001
...David Jenkins The purpose of this article is to show how three centrality measures—degree centrality, closeness centrality, and betweenness centrality—can advance the analysis of the Inka road network. It proposes that the Inka built storage facilities and/or administrative centers at regions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 51–73.
Published: 01 January 2018
... and administrative paper trail that allows ethnohistorians today to hypothesize about the singularity of native legal history and culture at the heart of the Spanish empire in America. The legal activism of the native officialdom also exemplifies a collective awareness of the potential of cross-regional networking...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 329–352.
Published: 01 April 2019
... foundered on the Lower Colorado and Gila River region’s tense Indigenous politics. Garcés’s expeditionary diary highlights the challenges of renegotiating the Native networks of enmity and alliance that characterized the river region. Two multiethnic Indigenous coalitions that competed for captives...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 237–268.
Published: 01 April 2021
... social networks across the region for their advantage and for the advantage of followers who had gravitated to them from surrounding shattered communities. The biographies and networks we have examined offer a basis for considering the workings and responses of Coast Salish leadership during times...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 91–112.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., and (directly or indirectly) had contacts with, or were influenced by, Indians both in adjacent regions and at quite distant locales. The same may well have been true of compa- rable groups of “settlement Indians” living in other parts of North America. The reach of the networks described in this article...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 143–166.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of indigenous Catholicism and Catholic kinship networks that bound eighteenth-century trading communities across the Great Lakes region. Those networks—strong, widespread, and highly important—were also thin: their spiritual practices and faith commitments did not in the 1760s deeply penetrate most Great Lakes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 133–169.
Published: 01 January 2000
... extravagant expectations and drama. But most year 2000 stories circulating in the region are actually variants of stories being diffused worldwide through evangelical networks and regular mass media. Papua New Guineans are intensely interested in millennial predictions because they perceive the millennium...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 349–371.
Published: 01 July 2018
...Susan Sleeper-Smith Abstract In the eighteenth-century western Great Lakes, the French and British established forts to guard a highly profitable fur trade. Places like Fort Michilimackinac became synonymous with the fur trade. In warmer regions an equally profitable Indian-controlled fur trade...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (2): 197–221.
Published: 01 April 2022
... and opportunities for skill development and social mobility. Participation, however, depended on intermediaries and their kin and social networks, meaning that not all had access. The analysis suggests that state-run archaeology must be understood in practical and economic terms as well as in a regional context...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 747–754.
Published: 01 October 2000
... with oral histories of contemporary peoples. In addition to ex- ploring these multiple links between written and oral historical accounts, Perez turns to recent studies of regional networks of trade, alliance, and warfare among indigenous peoples of the middle Orinoco and Guayana Shield to contextualize...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 123–155.
Published: 01 April 2001
...Pier M. Larson This article identifies historical transformations in the fluid and regionally varied secondary burials, or famadihana, of highland Madagascar. While secondary burials were known during the early nineteenth century, most mortuary ritual at that time focused on primary interment. From...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 445–466.
Published: 01 July 2010
... populations. This paper attempts an answer to this question for the Mixteca Baja region in southern Mexico, positing a shift in cacicazgo management away from direct involvement in local government and patronage networks and toward a more impersonal style of (often absentee) landownership. I assess...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 513–533.
Published: 01 October 2000
..., of cultural differences among the Warao people and of a multiethnic society in the Orinoco Delta. Silvia M. Vidal and I ground our ethnographic studies of the Arawak and the Aripaeño, respectively, in historical records and oral histories to analyze the role that indigenous regional networks of trade...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 597–620.
Published: 01 October 2018
... not dominate it until the late eighteenth century. This reconceptualization is based on the reconstruction of Amerindian regional networks, migrations, and the high degree of mobility between the Amazon delta and the Maroni River between 1600 and the 1730s, significantly focusing on the Aruã, Maraon...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 359–392.
Published: 01 July 2011
... 361 their household and community village much more than with any broader concept of Coast Salish identity. While routinely organized at the scale of the household, Coast Salish political structures were embedded in regional networks of social relations that could be politically mobilized...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 563–588.
Published: 01 July 2005
... on occasion, sometimes for extended periods. One or more of these households comprised the local group. Regional networks tied local groups together, whether or not corpo- rate groups were present. At least four networks, each accompanied by a different style of head deformation for the free, were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 575–595.
Published: 01 October 2018
... and anthropological insights have shown the complexity of native social formations and a strong regional interaction between Amazonian groups, both past and present (Viveiros de Castro 1996 ). In this sense, authors have recently emphasized the historical existence of multiethnic and multilingual networks...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (3): 442–443.
Published: 01 July 2017
... of the region. This eminently engaging and impeccably researched book should be considered essential reading for students and scholars alike. In Part 3, “How,” Dubcovsky analyzes the effects of the Yamasee War and its aftermath on communication networks, focusing on this singular event to examine how...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (4): 683–684.
Published: 01 October 2020
... with far-reaching consequences. This meeting place, Lee argues, was dominated by networks of rivers. From the 1300s to the 1830s, the Mississippi, Illinois, and Wabash rivers constituted the main conduits of power, trade, and communication in the region, and struggles over their control shaped the fate...