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racial violence

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 327–350.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., landscapes, historiographies, monuments, and music. In a political climate defined by ethnoracial and political tensions, colonial elites saw in the rebellion the republican ideology and racial violence of the Haitian Revolution. Fearing the persistence of social divisions and political resentment...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 101–108.
Published: 01 January 2022
... growing up in a racially segregated society, particularly in south-central Arkansas. Copyright 2022 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2022 grassroots activism racial violence arson Black solidarity Black church Jajuan Johnson: Please state your full name. Elmer Beard: I am...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 47–70.
Published: 01 January 2016
...: Limpieza de Sangre, Racial Violence, and Gendered Power in Early Colonial Mexico.” William and Mary Quarterly , 3rd ser. , 61 , no. 3 : 479 – 520 . Mota Padilla Matías de la 1920 Historia de la conquista del reino de la Nueva Galicia . Guadalajara : Talleres Gráficos de Gallardo y...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 29–51.
Published: 01 January 2021
... race-shifting was not uncommon for those light skinned enough to pass as white. For non-Caucasians, the stakes of not being white could mean the difference between employment and unemployment, being vulnerable to discriminatory laws, or encountering racial violence (Monroy 1999 : 149; Balderrama...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 149–173.
Published: 01 January 2020
... of Racial Violence in the Andes .” Identities 4 , no. 1 : 9 – 43 . Weismantel Mary . 2001 . Cholas and Pishtacos: Stories of Race and Sex in the Andes . Chicago : University of Chicago Press . ...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 589–633.
Published: 01 July 2005
.... Historical Society of Pennsylvania, The German Bleeds and Bears the Furs (Philadelphia,1764), Bc 612 D32b. The Indian figure holds a pipe tomahawk in his right hand. This is the earliest printed image of a pipe tomahawk in North America. pipe tomahawk to racial violence in the European imagination...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 771–773.
Published: 01 October 2007
...Sverker Finnström Terror and Violence: Imagination and the Unimaginable. Edited by Andrew Strathern, Pamela J. Stewart, and Neil L. Whitehead (Ann Arbor, MI: Pluto, 2006. viii + 250 pp., introduction, bibliographies, index. $95.00 cloth, $28.95 paper.) Violence. Edited by Neil L. Whitehead...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 757–759.
Published: 01 October 2007
..., such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference, when coupled with the disruptive insinuation of Jesuit...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 759–761.
Published: 01 October 2007
... attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 761–762.
Published: 01 October 2007
... attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 763–764.
Published: 01 October 2007
... it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference, when coupled with the disruptive insinuation of Jesuit missionaries into Huron—and not Iro- quois—villages, tore the Huron apart, making them easy targets for Iro- quois...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 764–766.
Published: 01 October 2007
... missionaries—into the lives of both the Huron and the Iroquois. Both groups attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 766–767.
Published: 01 October 2007
... attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 768–769.
Published: 01 October 2007
... attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 769–771.
Published: 01 October 2007
... attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 773–774.
Published: 01 October 2007
... attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 775–777.
Published: 01 October 2007
..., such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference, when coupled with the disruptive insinuation of Jesuit...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 778–779.
Published: 01 October 2007
..., such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference, when coupled with the disruptive insinuation of Jesuit...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 779–781.
Published: 01 October 2007
... missionaries—into the lives of both the Huron and the Iroquois. Both groups attempted to adapt to the inno- vations brought by Europeans, such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 781–783.
Published: 01 October 2007
..., such as guns, alcohol, and the commodi- fication of fur pelts. But the Huron came to fear the trade, connecting it with violence and death, while the Iroquois embraced trade goods as tools they could adapt for their own use. That difference, when coupled with the disruptive insinuation of Jesuit...