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polygamy

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 81–100.
Published: 01 January 2022
... of marriages of the macehualtin— polygamy, sororate, and levirate. Based on the available material (early censuses, inquisitorial records, sixteenth-century accounts) it discusses the functions that these types of unions played in Nahua society. Moreover, it reflects on the effects that the Christianization...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 153–154.
Published: 01 January 2021
..., including polygamy, a practice that increased the number of hands available to help with production. Moreover, Palka highlights the transformations in Lacandon religion as increased contact with outsiders elevated Akyantho, the god of trade and foreigners, over other deities (121). Joan Bristol discerns how...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 323–325.
Published: 01 April 2018
..., mistaken, and immoral: the Indians continue to worship idols and hold congress with Satan, and revel in polygamy and abandoned sexuality. They “sleep together like chickens” (41), he writes—one of several animal comparisons in the text. Above all, he routinely describes them as cannibals. Benzoni’s...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 691–711.
Published: 01 October 2012
..., the sermon’s mention of slavery and its abolishment seems to fall into place, however circumstantially, with the orthographic and philological analysis that places the text in the early to mid-­sixteenth century.34 The practice of polygamy was also commonplace among the Nahua nobility. Plural...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 772–776.
Published: 01 October 2003
... missionaries. Nevertheless, the Xavante con- tinued to live largely as before, as their diet remained the same, and polygamy continued. Garfield observes, however, that government patron- age did initiate one ongoing change...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 271–296.
Published: 01 April 2017
... in frequent miscarriages. He also believed that the practice of polygamy, mostly on the part of chiefs, served to depress fertility rates. 72 Much of the early nineteenth-century canonical travel literature also depicts Jê women as socially subordinate, citing the practice of polygamy by powerful men...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 71–93.
Published: 01 January 2016
... little to do with the Miskitu villages, which remained largely autonomous.38 Beyond this, the kings steadily lost a major mechanism of political integration: polygamy. Kings had to be monogamous and Chris- tian to pass muster as respectable rulers to an international audience. It was only now...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 187–194.
Published: 01 January 2007
... 189 Surely the Indians had a rather different view than the Spaniards did on what was called concubinage and polygamy, as is already well known. Here we see, with John F. Chuchiak IV, that celibacy for indigenous priests existed, but that it was ritual and therefore temporary; also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 323–351.
Published: 01 April 2012
... accused another of being the illegitimate child of a female slave and noble father, which became a euphemistic way of describing a polygamy. See Susan Kellogg, Law and the Transformation of Aztec, 1500–1700 (Norman, OK, 1995), 53, 57n; and Sarah Cline, “The Spiritual Conquest Reexamined...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 69–127.
Published: 01 January 2007
... Polygamy was the rule for Maya kings, but apparently higher and even mid-level nobles could take a large number of concubines. Juan Gutiérrez Picón, encomendero of Ekbalam, observed that although the lords and rich principal men were each “assigned one woman, this did not stop them from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 129–157.
Published: 01 January 2007
... in the New World (New Haven, CT, 1994). 45 Toribio Motolinía’s account of Indian witchcraft follows his account of Indian polygamy, and he links the Spanish virtues of baptism and monogamy while describing Indian devotion to Christian friars: “Our fathers, why are you...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 29–48.
Published: 01 January 2020
... outside the reserve’s band list, and with polygamy now outlawed, it would pay only one wife in a family. 43 With annuitants from various reserves arriving at Fort Battleford in 1882 apparently in the belief that they could be paid there, the government again refused to pay in town. That year...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 385–405.
Published: 01 July 2021
... in central-southern Chile. Among the major obstacles encountered by the missionaries, along with the widespread polygamy and a general lack of interest for the gospel, there was the belief that human agents, sorcerers known as kalku , caused illnesses and death. Among the Mapuche, sorcery was surrounded...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 January 2014
... the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act, for a Native woman to agree to marry a white man was to agree to one’s own tribal death, since the act legislated a loss of Indian status and accompanying rights for those women...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 199–200.
Published: 01 January 2014
... such as Johnson’s “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” and Oskison’s “The Problem of Old Harjo” explore the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act, for a Native woman to agree to marry a white man was to agree to one’s own tribal death...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 200–202.
Published: 01 January 2014
... such as Johnson’s “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” and Oskison’s “The Problem of Old Harjo” explore the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act, for a Native woman to agree to marry a white man was to agree to one’s own tribal death...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 202–203.
Published: 01 January 2014
.... Assimilation polices were dispropor- tionately directed against Native women, and stories such as Johnson’s “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” and Oskison’s “The Problem of Old Harjo” explore the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 204–205.
Published: 01 January 2014
...- tionately directed against Native women, and stories such as Johnson’s “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” and Oskison’s “The Problem of Old Harjo” explore the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act, for a Native woman to agree...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 205–207.
Published: 01 January 2014
... the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act, for a Native woman to agree to marry a white man was to agree to one’s own tribal death, since the act legislated a loss of Indian status and accompanying rights for those women...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 207–208.
Published: 01 January 2014
... such as Johnson’s “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” and Oskison’s “The Problem of Old Harjo” explore the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act, for a Native woman to agree to marry a white man was to agree to one’s own tribal death...