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political continuities

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 25–50.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Prudence M. Rice; Don S. Rice Abstract This article integrates ethnohistorical and archaeological data in examining political continuities or structural equivalencies in the lakes region of central Petén (southern Maya lowlands) between the Late and Terminal Classic periods and the Postclassic...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 11–33.
Published: 01 January 2010
...-changing European names for “Indian nations” that give an impression of near constant ethnogenesis, provide evidence of political continuity over time. American Society for Ethnohistory 2010 Reading Anishinaabe Identities: Meaning and Metaphor in Nindoodem Pictographs Heidi Bohaker...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 581–603.
Published: 01 October 2013
... that Alexander McGillivray and later Creek leaders would espouse in efforts to create a Creek “Confederacy” to stem the tide of American expansion. Conversely, the Cussetas pursued a continued town-centric concern for trade and diplomacy rooted in the historical and political past that trumpeted town interests...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (4): 683–726.
Published: 01 October 2011
... of the colonial period conceived of and experienced the political shifts of that period. This perspective emphasizes colonial-era experiences, in particular, while recognizing some of the common analo- gies that were used by the Maya in multiple temporal contexts to discuss change and continuity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 167–189.
Published: 01 April 2017
... that the deputy superintendent of Indian Affairs, Duncan Campbell Scott, proclaimed infamously, “Our object is to continue until there is not a single Indian in Canada that has not been absorbed into the body politic, and there is no Indian question and no Indian Department.” 2 The major piece of legislation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 731–746.
Published: 01 October 2000
... coherence and continuity amid severe political upheaval. Data gathering combined oral accounts for a period of about 120 years and the elicitation and reconstruction of genealogies in the migrating history of villages for as long as 230 years of Ye'kuana history. What makes this analysis different from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 633–655.
Published: 01 October 2006
... rallies, and rites of passage. Originally this music was highly political, forbidden because it critiqued colonial and postcolonial domi- nation and warned of threats to the Tuareg’s cultural survival. Although songs now address broader themes, some lyrics continue to commemorate and praise ideals...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 363–387.
Published: 01 July 2010
... political and spatial erasure of unrecognized California Indians. As allot- ments continue to change hands today—via hydroelectric and timber projects, con- servation initiatives, and housing developments—knowing their location is impor- tant for protecting cultural resources and for asserting...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 535–565.
Published: 01 July 2004
... to institute a bureaucratic-style administra- tion, continuing instead to rely on the traditional politics of allegiance, suzerainty, and the favors of the social and political elite. State projects were undermined by extensive corruption—of particular strategic concern for the British was their belief...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (2): 221–245.
Published: 01 April 2020
... enemies.” The merger of indigenous polities after the war can be understood not only as the continuation of a diplomatic tradition that preceded colonial settlement but also as a strategic and political exercise. “By pooling agricultural, trade, and spiritual resources,” explains Fisher (2014: 154...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 429–448.
Published: 01 July 2021
... toward a shared goal. These were not merely political relationships; these were alliances sanctified through the bonds of kinship. 19 During the late eighteenth century, the connections between the Cherokee and the Shawnee continued, and larger numbers of Cherokees, along with a group of Creek...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 61–94.
Published: 01 January 2015
... were quickly outnumbered and politically marginalized, and according to local histories either they were “fast fading away and [would] soon vanish from sight” or they “caused little anxiety during this period. They seem to have been gradually wasting away, due to the continual use of rum...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 583–585.
Published: 01 July 2014
... communities operate, resist, and champion their efforts within this political landscape. Rae Gould’s question at the beginning of her essay on the Nipmuc Nation petition concerning “why historical documents written by outsiders in the past and interpreted by outsiders in the present continue...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 217–239.
Published: 01 April 2017
... to represent the country’s history within a series of pompous and generally noncontested sequence of events. 25 One of the Puerto Rican doyens of sixteenth-century history on the island, Jalil Sued-Badillo ( 1978 ) has traditionally argued in favor of some form of cultural and political continuity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 743–767.
Published: 01 October 2002
... Within the Yuchi community, the commission’s and the Court’s deci- sions continued to be a point of contention throughout the years. The peti- tion and subsequent briefs furnish an interesting source to examine Indian politics...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 29–51.
Published: 01 January 2021
... educational theories and institutions tried to divide, denigrate, and assimilate indigenous students into white America. Without cultural and intellectual sovereignty, political and legal sovereignty would ring hollow. 13 During the 1960s, Forbes’s ethnohistorical writings continued to take...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 87–116.
Published: 01 January 2010
... nobility thus continued to dominate literacy and Maya politics into the early colonial times. The friars, at least at first, believed that their new converts’ rapid adoption of alphabetic literacy would lead to the quick obsolescence of their pre-Hispanic glyphic script. The reality, how- ever...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 605–637.
Published: 01 October 2007
... exemplify the adaptive, and ultimately more successful, political, social, and economic maneuvers employed by the Iowa in the early 1800s. Confronting declining wildlife resources and the continued encroachment of more powerful Indian neigh- bors, the Iowa in the 1820s began reshaping...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 180–182.
Published: 01 January 2015
.... In addition to probing the politics of writing, Parins describes the development of a lively literary culture in the late-­nineteenth-­century Cherokee Nation, reconstructing this culture through a careful reading of Indian Territory newspapers like the Cherokee Advocate and Indian Chief- tain...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 127–128.
Published: 01 January 2022
...-White Relations . Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press . Overall, this is an engaging book that is a must-read for anyone interested in present and future Indigenous political structures and on how settler colonialism has shaped, and continues to shape, Indigenous lives in Canada’s...