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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (3): 527–528.
Published: 01 July 2020
... looking to provide a Native perspective, or a theoretician of settler colonialism. And while A Whirlwind Passed through Our Country was not explicitly written for a broader audience, the stories told by Lakota witnesses to this seminal event are engaging and informative, a true joy for anyone interested...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (2): 137–161.
Published: 01 April 2022
...Kenton Storey Abstract This article is an examination of the impact of the pass system on First Nations people from the Treaty 4 District of Western Canada. The pass system, which was implemented by the Department of Indian Affairs (DIA) in 1885, was a system of administrative control that required...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 257–291.
Published: 01 April 2004
...Alan Passes The article focuses on the process of naoné —nationhood—of the Palikur, a Native American people of northern Brazil and southern French Guiana, from 1500 onward. It is described how, in counteraction to colonial expansion, a corpus of preexisting clans combined with diverse other...
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Published: 01 April 2022
Figure 2. “Pass book cover, Duck Lake Agency,” Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan, S-E19, file 35. More
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Published: 01 April 2022
Figure 3. “Pass, 1889, Duck Lake Agency,” Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan, S-E19, file 35. More
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Published: 01 April 2022
Figure 4. “Pass, 1897, Duck Lake Agency,” Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan, S-E19, file 35. More
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Published: 01 April 2022
Figure 5. “Pass, 1932, Duck Lake Agency,” Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan, S-E19, file 35. More
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Published: 01 April 2022
Figure 1. “Sample Pass, 1886,” LAC, RG 10, vol. 3584, file 1130, part 1B. More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (3): 515–540.
Published: 01 July 2012
...Maureen T. Schwarz Shortly after Congress passed the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) in 1988, casinos started appearing on reservations across North America and generating billions of dollars for some formerly destitute tribes. Despite general enthusiasm about gaming in Indian country...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (4): 569–588.
Published: 01 October 2009
... colonial legal cases indicate that the lands of a teccalli were of two kinds: collectively held lands of the teccalli as a whole and individually held lands of particular nobles of the house. Collectively held lands were passed down over generations undivided and served to maintain the integrity and power...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 571–596.
Published: 01 October 2010
... historically, so that the passing of the one marked the fading of the other, as the economic and cultural ties that shaped relationships between Algonquians and outsiders underwent a profound change in the early twentieth century. An imperial context ultimately determined how most Canadian institutions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 503–532.
Published: 01 July 2005
...Paul Hackett Until the mid-nineteenth century the Indians of the Central Subarctic consistently observed two mourning customs upon the passing of a close relative. The first was to destroy or dispose of the personal belongings of the deceased and those of the mourners while providing the corpse...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 723–741.
Published: 01 October 2002
..., most drawn in black ink with colored ink washes, that cover a span approximately from 1751-2 to 1886-7. The count was obtained by either John A. Anderson or Myrtle Miller Anderson and passed on to their family. It resurfaced in 1998, in an old trunk, and was donated to the Smithsonian Institution...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 671–695.
Published: 01 October 2003
... operation. In 1819, the Cherokee National Council passed a law to control spirituous liquors, but this action inflamed the federal government which recognized tribal alcohol regulation as an expression of Cherokee nationalism. As a bone of contention between the Cherokee Nation and the United States...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 515–535.
Published: 01 July 2019
...Anderson Hagler Abstract This article analyzes three eighteenth-century sodomy cases in New Mexico to highlight the ways in which colonial authorities passed judgment on their subjects and the landscapes that they inhabited. Examining how ethnocentric outlooks shaped the ways in which Spanish...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 April 2015
...Devon A. Mihesuah In response to white settlers' demands for tribal lands in the southeast, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act in 1830. The “Five Tribes”—Cherokees, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Muscogees (Creeks), and Seminoles—were then forced to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Natives had access...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 29–48.
Published: 01 January 2020
... of Treaty 6, in particular, chose to collectively spend their annuities in new towns to support traditional dances and ceremonies and, especially, to join together in large multiband gatherings. Despite increasingly restrictive government policies, particularly the pass system that limited Indigenous...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (2): 223–232.
Published: 01 April 2022
... of work. The inspiration to dedicate my research to the study of an Indigenous language came from Fred Wheatley, an Anishinaabe elder. He ‘lost his tongue’ through his experience in residential schools but regained it from his grandmother. He then dedicated his life to passing on that teaching to others...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 227–257.
Published: 01 April 2002
... patterns found more widely among Black Seminoles—all of the families are represented in the Texas and Mexico communities—and because the documentation for them is especially rich and reliable. Their names and those they passed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 535–565.
Published: 01 July 2004
... of a boundary line slowly being shifted farther and farther out. The British were concerned not with a border but with access—routes, passes, ease of transport, and availability of fodder for transport animals. The fron- tier was not a territorial unit with a defined border: routes defined the colo- nial...