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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 180–182.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Julia Logan Bourbois Katie Gale: A Coast Salish Woman's Life on Oyster Bay . By De Danaan Llyn . ( Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press , 2013 . 336 pp., illustrations, notes, bibliography . $29.95 cloth.) Copyright 2015 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2015 180...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 179–180.
Published: 01 January 2015
... analysis, he provides an able survey of a little-­known literary com- munity, raising questions for future exploration. DOI 10.1215/00141801-2821774 Katie Gale: A Coast Salish Woman’s Life on Oyster Bay. By Llyn De Danaan. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2013. 336 pp., illustra- tions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 725–727.
Published: 01 October 2003
..., and in this mixture were allowed to remain until they became thoroughly saturated. They were then gently dried, and, while drying, were continu- ally worked by hand and scraped with an oyster-shell or some suitable stone implement...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 803–806.
Published: 01 October 2015
.... Nobility Lost: French and Canadian Martial Cultures, Indians, and the End of New France (Adam Stueck) 193 De Danaan, Llyn. Katie Gale: A Coast Salish Woman’s Life on Oyster Bay (Julia Logan Bourbois) 180 Denial, Catherine J. Making Marriage: Husbands, Wives, and the Ameri- can...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 213–216.
Published: 01 January 2019
... in season or moving closer to oyster beds. Then as now, scientific knowledge came hard, especially when it conflicted with authority. Reséndez and S. White have usefully focused on broad and important patterns in North American history. They add texture to our understanding of the “new order” that took...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 655–687.
Published: 01 October 2001
... Provincial Inca: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Assessment of the Impact of the Inca State. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press. Marcos, Jorge G. 1978 Cruising to Acapulco and Back with the Thorny Oyster...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 201–223.
Published: 01 April 2010
... better prices for peltries than did the monopoly French West Indies Company. They supplied goods cheaply, including luxuries such as oysters, white sugar, ribbons, lace, and colored stockings; and valuable trade supplies such as wampum and the prized English woolens...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 389–414.
Published: 01 July 2010
... good salted, and Bayou St. John produces “nice little turtles.” The clams found in Lake Pontchartrain (Rangia cuneata) are best deep fried.27 The archaeological record confirms the authors’ citation of oysters as a key food in the late summer. But another kind of shellfish was described...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 445–489.
Published: 01 July 2011
... : Italperu . Pillsbury Joanne 1996 The Thorny Oyster and the Origins of Empire: Implications of Recently Uncovered Spondylus Imagery . Latin American Antiquity 7 : 313 – 40 . Pizarro Pedro 1965 [1571] Relación del descubrimiento y conquista de los reinos del Perú . Pérez...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 365–366.
Published: 01 April 2014
.... The six archaeological case studies cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 367–368.
Published: 01 April 2014
.... The six archaeological case studies cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 368–370.
Published: 01 April 2014
... the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift to cockles, although she is does not rule out...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 370–372.
Published: 01 April 2014
.... The six archaeological case studies cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 372–373.
Published: 01 April 2014
.... The six archaeological case studies cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 374–375.
Published: 01 April 2014
... and contemporary. The six archaeological case studies cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 376–379.
Published: 01 April 2014
... the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift to cockles, although she is does not rule out...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 379–380.
Published: 01 April 2014
... the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift to cockles, although she is does not rule out...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 380–382.
Published: 01 April 2014
.... The six archaeological case studies cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 382–383.
Published: 01 April 2014
.... The six archaeological case studies cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 383–385.
Published: 01 April 2014
... cover the globe, from Denmark, Japan, and Brazil to the US Southwest and Southeast. Nicky Milner shows how Mesolithic-­Neolithic (5400–3700 BCE) exploiters of oysters in Den- mark may have overexploited that resource and therefore forced themselves to shift to cockles, although she is does...