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nun

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 885–888.
Published: 01 October 2002
...-first cen- tury interpretations. 6762 ETHNOHISTORY / 49:4 / sheet 165 of 193 Wild Country Out in the Garden: The Spiritual Journals of a Colonial Mexican Nun. Selected, edited, and translated by Kathleen A. Myers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 543–544.
Published: 01 July 2001
... life; it also widens our perspective by specifi- cally focusing on the ‘‘spiritual economy’’ of the region. By spiritual econ- omy Burns refers to the dense network of interests and investments that tied the sacred world inhabited by nuns to the material world beyond enclo- sure. She clearly...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 415–444.
Published: 01 July 2010
... the men’s, they were probably of equal importance.6 Despite their early participation in confraternities, Nahua women were prohibited from professing as nuns until 1724. Due to this exclusion, their presence in convents was largely the result of their work as servants. Their duties...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 880–885.
Published: 01 October 2002
...: The Spiritual Journals of a Colonial Mexican Nun. Selected, edited, and translated by Kathleen A. Myers and Amanda Powell. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, xxxv + pp., preface, introduction, notes, bibliography, maps...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 745–746.
Published: 01 October 2016
... government laws and actions. This group included middle-class lay political activists, over two thousand exiled priests and nuns, and tens of thousands of labor emigrants. Young argues that the Cristero diaspora was an influential subset of the 1.5 million ethnic Mexicans residing in the United States during...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 551–552.
Published: 01 October 2017
... their oppression. But he was stymied by his diocesan clergy, firm guardians of Chiapas’s Jim Crow–like social order, and the local oligarchy, which kept him on a tight leash. Turning elsewhere, he recruited Andrés Aubry (a French priest) and Angélica Inda (a US-educated Mexican nun) to jump-start a “pedagogy...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 371–379.
Published: 01 October 2022
... of San Gregorio, they would invest in their spiritual well-being by donating money to a charitable cause, such as the dowry for an orphan girl to profess in the Convent of Corpus Christi. The prayers of the orphans of San Juan de Letrán, and those of the nuns of Corpus Christi, seemed to have been...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 477–491.
Published: 01 October 2022
... in instructing Native girls in the faith so they could become nuns; however, colonial officials rejected this idea because they believed that Indigenous women lacked the abilities required for life in the convent (Muriel 1995 : 26). The first convents founded in New Spain were devoted to Spaniards and criollas...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 544–546.
Published: 01 July 2001
... for agricultural stagnation. It was left to the Republican regimes of the nine- teenth century to confiscate assets; to force religious communities to pro- vide loans to the government; to ease the renunciation of a nun’s vows; to create alternative public institutions to educate youth and to care for orphans...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 592–594.
Published: 01 July 2014
... used marriage and informal liaisons to forge complex social and economic networks. The next three essays highlight women’s contributions to healing and medicine. Nuria Salazar Simarron and Sarah E. Owens offer a look into the lives of nuns and their servants and the important role...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 673–687.
Published: 01 October 2005
... Arevillaga was a twenty-eight-year-old mulata slave of a nun and lived cloistered in the convent of Santa Catalina Martir in Santiago.56 Despite her slave status, Inquisition authorities listed de Arevillaga as don- cella, or virgin. She had received an education in the convent, as evidenced...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (1): 219–224.
Published: 01 January 2002
.... In the first half of the twentieth century, a few anthropologists, the photographer Edward Curtis, a Catholic nun and priest, and another physi- cian published descriptions of the sweat lodge, some specifying Native sources...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 3–8.
Published: 01 January 2007
... Haskett (Norman, OK, 1997). Several other articles and studies followed, including Elisa Sampson Vera Tudela, “Fashioning a Cacique Nun: From Saints’ Lives to Indian Lives,” Gender History 9.2 (1997): 171–200; Rebecca Overmyer-Velázquez, “Christian Morality Revealed in New Spain...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (4): 603–619.
Published: 01 October 2020
...) to Callao (Peru). This document (“Sobre embarcación”) is also discussed in Muñoz Correa 2003 : 119–21. 10 Evidence for slaves in Lima’s convents includes Archivo Arzobispal de Lima (hereafter AAL), Monasterio de La Encarnación, IX: 90 1659 “Autos seguidos de doña Ana de Carrión,” against two nuns...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 459–467.
Published: 01 July 2016
..., or a desire to “set the record straight,” let alone to engage in a “dialogue of healing.” One of the most negative statements I heard concerned the Anglican residential school at Port Alberni: “Some of the nuns were tough on you, but it was for your own good.” Others spoke nostalgically about their days...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 291–310.
Published: 01 April 2021
... become a nun, and so on. Since he could not speak Spanish or Nahuatl well, he collaborated with a couple of weavers for translation, likely also from the Portuguese Indies, and split his earnings with them. He admitted to performing more than two hundred palm readings and charged between one and four...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 407–427.
Published: 01 July 2021
... their families but also forced children to eat foods they were not accustomed to, dress in European-style uniforms instead of their traditional clothing, and practice Christianity in place of their spiritual practices. Nuns and priests handed down brutal punishments for Oneida children who spoke their language...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 129–157.
Published: 01 January 2007
... to the authorities than men who expressed their femininity through dress and therefore freely chose to limit their social power.70 A good example of a woman who cross-dressed and was tolerated by the authorities, and one of the few examples that in fact exists, is the Spanish nun Catalina de Erauso. Said...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 337–350.
Published: 01 April 2001
... Phillips’s essay ‘‘Nuns, Ladies, and the ‘Queen of the Huron’ ’’ demon- strates that the supposed collectors of Huron artworks were, in actuality, producers. Graburn neatly summarizes the dilemma of identity and ethnic 6326 Ethnohistory 48:1/2...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 618–620.
Published: 01 July 2006
... against Indians, the nuns took over the reservation schools. Reid speculates that the move may have expressed the Indian Department’s desire to contain Kahnawake nationalism and traditionalism, ‘‘demonstrate its power, and implement its assimilationist policies’’ in the face of overwhelming Kahna...