1-20 of 1562 Search Results for

note

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 5. (a) Greenville Treaty belt (fragment). Note cut fringe on left. Courtesy of Ohio History Connection (H50297). (b) Fort Stanwix Treaty belt, 1784. Courtesy New York State Museum, Albany, NY. (c) Greenville Treaty belt, digitally restored according to the author’s analysis. Image More
Image
Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 1. Map of transcription locations. Note: Generated using the ggmap package in R (Kahle and Wickham 2013 ). More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 498–499.
Published: 01 July 2010
..., acknowledgments, notes on coeditors, notes on contributors, introduction, bibliography. $27.95 paper.) Mikaëla M. Adams, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Today there is a powerful commitment to self-​determination among Canada’s First Nations. Struggling against centuries of oppression...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 433–472.
Published: 01 July 2001
..., through which an Amerindian identity was remade as part of the ethnographic project. Barbeau, a noted Canadian anthropologist, studied and collected Huron-Wyandot culture from 1911 until 1914. Working within the salvage paradigm, he rejected the idea that historic-era cultural adaptions could constitute...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (3): 407–443.
Published: 01 July 2007
... transmitted. Noting that the source of many of these ideas is often native peoples, it suggests moving beyond the tendency to say they did or did not see Europeans as gods. Focusing in particular on a close reading of Henry Hudson's 1609 voyage up the river that now bears his name, it argues...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 709–739.
Published: 01 October 2010
... codices, Avendaño notes that the Itzá “want it to be understood that they give homage to it because this is the tree of whose fruit our first father Adam ate.” As no known pre-Hispanic source uses the term yax cheel cab, how are we to interpret Avendaño's report? Based on iconographic as well...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 509–524.
Published: 01 October 2008
..., but also limits, of state power because, as Eric Wolf noted long ago, brokers by definition never work simply to resolve the contending interests they mediate but must also perpetuate them if they want to retain their own strategic positions. At the same time, in ethnically stratified societies...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 393–419.
Published: 01 July 2011
... the Age of Revolutions (1760–1850). Two episodes are noted in which enslaved blacks spoke fluent Eng lish as a means to convince British and United States officials that they merited immediate emancipation. Copyright 2011 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2011 Interpreters, Translators...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 37–63.
Published: 01 January 2011
...Chris Andersen Scholars have long noted the central place of racialization in the last five centuries of colonial rule and likewise the crossracial encounters and eventual colonial intimacies regulated in its shadow. In the conceptual terrain posted by these demarcations, this article explores how...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 April 2021
... since the late fifteenth century. The author submitted this revised version of the original essay after editing the content, adding notes, and citing relevant works published since 2012. If some feared the wrath of the new god, others lamented the loss of their old deities, who used to protect them...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
... periods. Striking commonalities, as noted, are those that link weaving activities with pregnancy and childbirth. Additionally, objects and iconography related to women and birth—in the form of serpents, umbilical cords, and ropes—tie the act of birth to primordial creation events and highlight...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 363–384.
Published: 01 July 2013
... allows the author to examine the social structure of the new creole class and to note that there was a high degree of social stratification within the estate. Copyright 2013 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2013 “A Class of People Admitted to the Better Ranks”: The First Generation of Creoles...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Claudia B. Haake This article discusses the arguments made by Seneca supporters of the United States' removal policy and notes the similarity of these arguments to those made by the policy's Iroquois supporters. Yet while one group used their criticisms as a way of rejecting removal, the other...
Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 8. Aerial view of Elbowoods being flooded by the Garrison Reservoir in 1956. Note the submerged treetops in the background. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, 194-16-2 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2017
Figure 9. Abstract of title map of the allotment of Edna Wright in Island Township, indicated by the shading in the far upper right corner. Note the location of Rosedale Township toward the southeast of Island Township. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2020
Figure 4. Nave of the ruins of San Francisco Xavier de la Nasca, from which ghosts are said to emerge. Note the concrete altar in the foreground, dating to the modern use of the church until the earthquake of 1996. Photograph by author. More
Image
Published: 01 October 2021
Figure 17. X.030, length of rule of Xolotl, visible light image, 113 years with speech scroll (17a). Note that three blue disks for years outlined in iron gall ink on the right remain partially visible. Note also the bracketing of the five symbols for twenty years on the left in iron gall ink More
Image
Published: 01 October 2021
Figure 9. Nopaltzin at Xiuhtepec (9a). 9b. Xolotl with a Chichimec with tepotzohtli (kyphosis, spinal curvature) glyph. 9c. Xolotl and Nopaltzin observe Toltecs at Totolapan; note four blue disks indicating a duration of four years. 9d. Xolotl and Zacatitechcochtli at Cuauhtlixco. X.011. © More
Image
Published: 01 October 2021
Figure 13. Acatomatl at Zohuatepec (13a), glossed cohuatepec , with founding date 1 Tecpatl. 13b. Mitliztac receives Nopaltzin (left) at Tepeyacac to the east. 13c. Tecpa and Iztaccuauhtli to the west, note the effaced area at the end of the rising black line: this is the origin for Nopaltzin’s More
Image
Published: 01 October 2021
Figure 7. Infrared imaging detail of X.011 enhances two speech scrolls above the right-facing eagle (cuāuhtli) between Xolotl and fellow Chichimec at Cuauhnahuac (7a). Dibble mistakenly identifies the Chichimec as Ocotoch, does note the speech scrolls, but misidentifies the bird as a turkey More