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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 561–579.
Published: 01 October 2000
... of horticultural products for fish and game. This article analyzes the demographic characteristics and social organization of the area and attempts to disentangle the intricate network of Waraoan and non-Waraoan speakers there during early colonial times. American Society for Ethnohistory 2000 Abbad, Fray...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 655–687.
Published: 01 October 2001
...David Jenkins The purpose of this article is to show how three centrality measures—degree centrality, closeness centrality, and betweenness centrality—can advance the analysis of the Inka road network. It proposes that the Inka built storage facilities and/or administrative centers at regions...
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Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 2. Network map of ethnographically known social connections of Slabebkud circa 1840s–1850s. More
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Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 3. Slabebkud ego-network, illustrating connections to fourteen important people or groups of people. More
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Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 4. Network map of ethnographically known social connections of Snatelum circa 1820s–52. More
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Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 5. Snatelum ego-network, illustrating connections to thirty important people or groups. More
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Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 6. Network map of ethnographically known social connections of Shashia circa 1820s–1850s. More
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Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 7. Shashia ego-network, illustrating connections to fifty important people or groups throughout and beyond the Salish Sea. More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 597–620.
Published: 01 October 2018
... zone for Amerindians fleeing European colonization. On the contrary, this article argues that the migrations and movements of people toward and within this Amerindian space have to be understood as a continuation of a pre-European set of indigenous networks. Through the reconstruction of multilingual...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (3): 489–513.
Published: 01 July 2012
...Alejandra Dubcovsky Indian information networks crisscrossed the colonial Southeast. Operating outside European control and hidden from European eyes, these networks' existence and importance have been assumed but never fully explicated. This article explores some of these inter- and intra-Indian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (4): 643–664.
Published: 01 October 2020
... maintained independence for more than 350 years while Puebloan independence lasted 16, examining the military power networks of the Che and Puebloans and the timing of resistance to Spanish incursion. These comparisons highlight some of the diverse reactions of foreign groups and how connections between...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 237–268.
Published: 01 April 2021
...Figure 2. Network map of ethnographically known social connections of Slabebkud circa 1840s–1850s. ...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 329–352.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Naomi Sussman Abstract Drawing on expeditionary diaries, official correspondence, Indigenous-authored petitions, and incident reports, this article argues that between 1771 and 1783, the Quechán and “Maricopa” alliance networks controlling the Lower Colorado and Gila Rivers compelled Spanish...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 91–112.
Published: 01 January 2011
... as indirect evidence of a vast native social and political world largely hidden from modern eyes. By plotting the career and distribution of particular rumors, one may get a sense of channels of communication and networks of exchange among the native peoples in the Hudson Valley as well as of the ties...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 143–166.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of indigenous Catholicism and Catholic kinship networks that bound eighteenth-century trading communities across the Great Lakes region. Those networks—strong, widespread, and highly important—were also thin: their spiritual practices and faith commitments did not in the 1760s deeply penetrate most Great Lakes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 477–491.
Published: 01 October 2022
...Mónica Díaz Abstract This essay focuses on the connective networks among Native peoples that the Jesuit Colegio of San Gregorio and the Good Death Congregation promoted. Specifically, it discusses how aspects of what the article calls the economy of salvation allowed for the strengthening of social...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (2): 195–225.
Published: 01 April 2024
... also involved in ololiuhqui networks and seldom wished to comply with his investigations. As a result, well into the 1630s the priest courted the Holy Office of the Inquisition in Mexico with the goal of obtaining jurisdiction over all colonial racial and ethnic categories in New Spain. Ruiz de Alarcón...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 133–169.
Published: 01 January 2000
... extravagant expectations and drama. But most year 2000 stories circulating in the region are actually variants of stories being diffused worldwide through evangelical networks and regular mass media. Papua New Guineans are intensely interested in millennial predictions because they perceive the millennium...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (2): 423–452.
Published: 01 April 2000
...Susan Sleeper-Smith This article focuses on four Native women who were Christian converts and married French fur traders. As “cultural mediators” and“negotiators of change” they mediated the face-to-face exchange of goods for peltry in the western Great Lakes through Catholic kin networks...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 123–155.
Published: 01 April 2001
... the 1820s practices of secondary burial re-emerged from long-distance repatriation of soldiers' remains and from ceremonies of tomb-to-tomb transfer as kin built new sepulchres of stone. Because they consumed time, energy, significant financial resources and tended to strengthen local networks of loyalty...