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music

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 431–432.
Published: 01 April 2016
... of lurches in policy making endemic to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the musical culture shifted dramatically as well. Early on Alaska Natives took prominent roles in campus musical organizations, as many of them had already received training in playing European instruments in missionary schools...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 454–456.
Published: 01 April 2016
...Shanna Lorenz Intimate Distance: Andean Music in Japan . By Bigenho Michelle . ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2012 . xii + 248 pp., acknowledgments, black-and-white figures, bibliography, index . $79.95 cloth, $22.95 paper.) Copyright 2016 by American Society...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 355–357.
Published: 01 April 2008
... diverse peoples” (59). 10.1215/00141801-2007-076 Vodou Nation: Haitian Art Music and Cultural Nationalism. By Michael Largey. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006. 283 pp., illustrations, glossary, notes, bibliography, index. $25.00 paper.) Joshua H. Nadel, North Carolina Central...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 351–353.
Published: 01 April 2009
... into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged to leave at once,” so they sang the “good tidings” to the assembled Senecas instead. The following week, however...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 October 2017
..., many in color, showcases vintage guitars and their players. Kīkā Kila is highly recommended to readers concerned with the history of Hawai‘i, American popular music, or the global circulation of culture during the twentieth century. Troutman thoughtfully assesses the “dissonance” in the steel...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 171–172.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Grant Arndt Recording Culture: Powwow Music and the Aboriginal Recording Industry on the Northern Plains . By Scales Christopher A. . ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2012 . xi + 368 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, bibliography, index, CD . $24.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 633–655.
Published: 01 October 2006
...Susan Rasmussen This essay examines the origins and directions of ichumar (also called tichumaren in some regions), a genre of guitar music popular among young Tuaregs in Mali and Niger. Initially composed and performed by Tuareg nationalist/separatist rebels, it is now composed and performed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 327–350.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., landscapes, historiographies, monuments, and music. In a political climate defined by ethnoracial and political tensions, colonial elites saw in the rebellion the republican ideology and racial violence of the Haitian Revolution. Fearing the persistence of social divisions and political resentment...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 121–122.
Published: 01 January 2023
...Sarah Quick The bulk of his analyses of musical performances come in the next three chapters. Chapter 3 examines performances bringing early music (Western classical) together with Indigenous music and/or Indigenous musicians, albeit in different ways, while chapter 4 takes on the issue of songs...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 401–427.
Published: 01 October 2022
... Arzobispal de Sucre, San Luis de Sacaca (La Plata), 1680. In rural and urban areas Andeans themselves taught music lessons to other Native youngsters. 63 Durston ( 2007 ) based his work on a substantial amount of Andean church assistants’ translations of pastoral writing to the Quechua vernacular from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 748–749.
Published: 01 October 2019
..., it is richly illustrated with maps, photographs of documents, sheet music, and codex images. Readers will find novel themes among the many topics discussed. The book includes a lengthy discussion of music to show how Nahuas, who had their own musical traditions, embraced European musical styles...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 189–190.
Published: 01 January 2004
... Rath’s chapter, ‘‘Drums and Power: Ways of Creolizing Music in Coastal South Carolina and Georgia, 1730–90 The title of this chapter does not do it justice. It opens with a long, impressive discussion of the basic issues involved in interpreting creolization. Its first seven pages discuss the evo...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 765–783.
Published: 01 October 2012
... Nahuatl to their sixteenth-­century protégés in Guatemala, as is evident in the musical works of Tomás Pascual, a Maya choirmaster from San Juan Ixcoy, Huehuetenango. Pascual’s polyphonic compositions—some of the earliest surviving from colonial Latin America and more important still...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 309–311.
Published: 01 April 2009
... well drenched” (201). On another occasion, the missionaries lured a large number of Senecas into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 311–313.
Published: 01 April 2009
... well drenched” (201). On another occasion, the missionaries lured a large number of Senecas into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 313–315.
Published: 01 April 2009
... well drenched” (201). On another occasion, the missionaries lured a large number of Senecas into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 315–317.
Published: 01 April 2009
... into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged to leave at once,” so they sang the “good tidings” to the assembled Senecas instead. The following week, however...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 317–318.
Published: 01 April 2009
... well drenched” (201). On another occasion, the missionaries lured a large number of Senecas into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 318–320.
Published: 01 April 2009
... well drenched” (201). On another occasion, the missionaries lured a large number of Senecas into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 320–321.
Published: 01 April 2009
... into the schoolhouse with a small organ called a melodeon. The Senecas enjoyed the music it made, but the missionaries knew that if they spoke “one word about the ‘Jesus Way’” they would be “obliged to leave at once,” so they sang the “good tidings” to the assembled Senecas instead. The following week, however...