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mulato

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 758–761.
Published: 01 October 2003
..., though different in aim, scope, and language group, speaks to the agenda of the Maya Movement leaders, as outlined by Brown, elaborated by Garzón, and instantiated by Wuqu’ Ajpub’. Negros, mulatos, esclavos y libertos en...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 713–738.
Published: 01 October 2012
... helped further their interests in a society divided between two cultural spheres, Hispanic and indigenous. This article highlights the unique position of sixteenth-century mestizos and mulatos as bearers of indigenous culture and language in colonial Mexico. These individuals born of mixed unions were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 397–398.
Published: 01 April 2019
... would become the colony’s standard identity categories— español , indio , negro , mestizo , and mulato —and finds evidence of precocious stereotyping; the authorities tended to view the last three groups as suspect and threatening nearly from the start. Yet this is not primarily a story about...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 361–384.
Published: 01 April 2015
... Schwaller has urged us to con- sider that during the early colonial period, most mulatos living in Mexico City may have actually been born of unions between indigenous women and men of African descent.5 This revisionist shift has led scholars to reexamine official correspon- dence from municipal...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 667–674.
Published: 01 October 2012
... Ethnohistory 668 Yanna Yannakakis ler’s piece, “The Importance of Mestizos and Mulatos as Bilingual Inter- mediaries in Sixteenth-­Century New Spain,” mestizos and mulatos spoke Nahuatl in quotidian settings in order to configure spaces of intercultural...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 721–747.
Published: 01 October 2013
... their own terminology. Beyond Spaniard and Indian, the most important terms used in late colonial Guatemala were: ladino (see above); mestizo, the offspring of Spanish and indigenous; castizo, the offspring of Spanish and mestizo; negro to refer to free or enslaved Africans; mulato, the free or...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 291–310.
Published: 01 April 2021
... the transmission of knowledge. Don Gabriel García Moctezuma, minister of justice and protector of indios, caught and chained an unnamed runaway slave in Mexico City variously described as chino, mulato, and negro. The captive threatened that, if not released, he would blaspheme in the presence of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 673–687.
Published: 01 October 2005
... de Fuentes’s complaint to Inquisition authorities that his wife bewitched him with sorcery. Juan, a thirty-three-year-old mulato con- struction worker in Santiago, denounced his mulata wife Cecilia to the Inquisition, accusing her of acting as a sorcerer-witch (hechizera-bruja). He charged that...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 761–765.
Published: 01 October 2003
.... See also Ben Vinson III, Bearing Arms for His Majesty: The Free-Colored Militia in Colonial Mexico (Stanford, ca, 2001); and Paul Lokken, ‘‘Undoing Racial Hier- archy: Mulatos and Militia Service in Colonial Guatemala secolas Annals 31...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 351–380.
Published: 01 April 2016
... document mining women’s work, but their subordination of indigenous identity to married status requires some unpacking. A few examples from the mid-sixteenth to the late seventeenth century demonstrate this tendency. In 1569 Hernán García, mulato , and Mari Flores, “su muger,” petitioned to form a...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 753–758.
Published: 01 October 2003
... Maya Movement leaders, as outlined by Brown, elaborated by Garzón, and instantiated by Wuqu’ Ajpub’. Negros, mulatos, esclavos y libertos en la Costa Rica del siglo XVII. By Rina Cáceres. (Mexico City: Instituto...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (4): 561–583.
Published: 01 October 2011
... consent of militia captain don Joaquín Suárez and was “against the wishes of all of the [militia] companies Lara had been respected by his fellow soldiers and had distinguished himself in 1766 when he led a troop of “pardos and mulatos” in repelling an attack on the area by pirates Cavalry ensign...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 739–764.
Published: 01 October 2012
... heterodoxy in rural parts of west- ern Mexico, where the physical apparatus of the Inquisition and the dio- cesan Church was weak or nonexistent. This essay thus offers similarities with Robert C. Schwaller’s essay in this issue, “The Importance of Mes- tizos and Mulatos as Bilingual Intermediaries in...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 785–790.
Published: 01 October 2012
... see Spanish men communicating in Nahuatl in Jalisco while acting as notaries for indigenous communities; mestizos and mulatos playing the role of bilingual intermediaries in inquisitorial cases all across Mexico; Nahuatl and Mayan speakers in Guatemalan settlements using Nahuatl in daily...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 259–280.
Published: 01 April 2006
... plants from indios, about ‘‘coca and the drink Indians call ‘chicha’ from a negra and about the sacred altar stone from a mulato sacristan.42 In turn, doña Luisa would teach her knowledge to others. Sometimes she would even write out prayers and send them to acolytes—to the inquisitors’ great...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 327–350.
Published: 01 April 2016
... Sierra was inspired by a local symbolic lexicon coming from the “the millenarian synthesis of the Indians and the blacks”: “ Mulatos , blacks and Indians, that’s a very significant aspect that we find in the movement of José Leonardo Chirino, those movements have a real syncretism”; “overall, in...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 151–159.
Published: 01 January 2003
... with such a priest, because he is only for ladinos and not for us. They are our main affliction, and it is unjust that mulatos and mestizos live in our village when we wish to dwell in peace and without prejudice against us If...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 35–67.
Published: 01 January 2007
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 597–621.
Published: 01 July 2015
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 229–251.
Published: 01 April 2014