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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2002) 49 (2): 462–466.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., notes, bibliography,index. $50.00 cloth.) 2002 Axtell, James 1988 After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America . New York: Oxford University Press. Sweet, David 1995 The Ibero-American Frontier Mission in Native American History. In The New Latin American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2003) 50 (4): 643–669.
Published: 01 October 2003
...Steven W. Hackel This article reinterprets the 1785 Indian rebellion at Mission San Gabriel in Alta California by reexamining the testimony of the Indians accused of leading this uprising. For decades, scholarly and popular discussions of this event have focused on the role of Toypurina, an Indian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2007) 54 (3): 568–569.
Published: 01 July 2007
...Stephen Sloan Landscapes of Fraud: Mission Tumacacori, the Baca Float, and the Betrayal of the O'Odham. By Thomas E. Sheridan. (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2006. 316 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, bibliography, index. $35.00 cloth.) American Society for...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2000) 47 (3-4): 823–825.
Published: 01 October 2000
...: Indians,Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815 . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Book Reviews Battle for the Soul: Métis Children Encounter Evangelical Protestants at Mackinaw Mission, By Keith R. Widder. (East...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2009) 56 (4): 589–624.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Sarah Peelo The motivations for relatively rapid incorporation of Native Californian populations into the Spanish mission system are the subject of anthropological and historical debate (e.g., S. Cook 1976; Coombs and Plog 1977; Duggan 2000; Guest 1979; Hackel 2005; Jackson 1999; Larson, Johnson...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2010) 57 (2): 336–337.
Published: 01 April 2010
..., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill What is religion? Who can define “religion”? What are the implications of religious freedom? Tisa Wenger’s We Have a Religion explores these ques- tions through the previously understudied 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance con- troversy. Using Catholic mission records...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2017) 64 (1): 165–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
... some governing body such as the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM). Conflicted Mission : Faith, Disputes, and Deception on the Dakota Frontier expertly tells the story of a number of missionaries who worked under the auspices of the ABCFM in Minnesota from around 1830...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2010) 57 (4): 750–751.
Published: 01 October 2010
... sanctuary for the displaced attracted numerous Indians to the Pachgatgoch mission. Yet how all the Indians really felt about Christianity and the mis- sionaries remains somewhat ambiguous. However, some of their multiple conversions disclose mutual trust and understanding. Maweseman, whose conversion...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2010) 57 (2): 225–262.
Published: 01 April 2010
...Lee M. Panich The indigenous groups incorporated into the Spanish missions of Alta and Baja California faced a variety of challenges during the colonial period and experienced a wide range of outcomes in the persistence of native identity. The indigenous Paipai community of Santa Catarina, located...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2010) 57 (3): 500–501.
Published: 01 July 2010
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2010) 57 (4): 759–763.
Published: 01 October 2010
... mission. Yet how all the Indians really felt about Christianity and the mis- sionaries remains somewhat ambiguous. However, some of their multiple conversions disclose mutual trust and understanding. Maweseman, whose conversion gave him the Christian name Gideon, and his converted son, called...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2013) 60 (1): 101–124.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Julia Sarreal Both the Crown and Catholic missionaries believed that frontier Indians needed to practice settled agriculture and animal husbandry in order to become civilized. For over a century Jesuit missionaries among the Guaraní Indians of South America tried to Europeanize mission inhabitants...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2005) 52 (3): 646–648.
Published: 01 July 2005
... the most contentious issues in California ethnohistory has been the history and legacy of the California missions. In his recent book, James Sandos searches for common ground between contending historical interpretations. ‘‘Chistophilic Triumphal- ists associated with the late Francis Guest...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2017) 64 (1): 152–153.
Published: 01 January 2017
...Thomas Whigham Sarreal gives the individual missions far more specific treatment than was true with previous studies (save perhaps for that of Maeder). This is a real accomplishment and clearly reflects the quantitative nature of the records that she has analyzed with such patience and care. She...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2008) 55 (3): 439–464.
Published: 01 July 2008
...Robert Galler On 28 January 1886, Crow Creek leaders sent a petition with over one hundred signatures to the Office of Indian Affairs affirming their interest in a Catholic mission school. Within the year, the first buildings were in place for an educational institution that served as a Catholic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 47–80.
Published: 01 January 2005
... at key historical moments so as to give a mythicmagical quality to the transformative processes of government, mission, and commerce. Many of the cult's new important spirit beings are extensions of the cult leader Dakoa, whose personhood embodies a history and provides a model for a new, pacified...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2018) 65 (4): 621–645.
Published: 01 October 2018
... settlements and the mission, or partially colonized village, which had an indirect or direct contact with each other. Copyright 2018 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2018 Tapajós Trombetas Amazon regional network interethnic relations This article will examine two contrasting Amerindian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2019) 66 (1): 95–116.
Published: 01 January 2019
... northern peoples known as Chichimecs. Historians have cast them as eager volunteers and interpreted the campaign as another example of Tlaxcala’s distinguished colonial service. However, records written by Tlaxcalans in their own language (Nahuatl) reveal that the mission met a furious resistance and that...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2002) 49 (4): 789–820.
Published: 01 October 2002
... ethnohistory. Additionally, his entries expose another dimension of this encounter—the dependency of this British enclave upon local people for resources, knowledge, and other forms of assistance. The Admiralty's restriction on the use of force during this mission makes their need all the more apparent. I...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2005) 52 (2): 407–435.
Published: 01 April 2005
... Malagasy people about the proper land-labor relationship. One entailed a combative relationship to land, rock, and trees, while the other stressed the protection of forests. State officials maintained the contradictions of their “civilizing mission” by conceptually and administratively separating public...