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midwifery

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
... insights into beliefs and rituals associated with childbirth and midwifery among prehispanic Maya populations. A review of colonial-period Nahuatl sources provides a comparative perspective for framing the Maya data within the broader context of pre-Conquest Mesoamerica. Despite the events that have...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 441–463.
Published: 01 July 2018
... that women were titiçih (healing ritual specialists), the scholarship has primarily focused on their role in midwifery. This article first uses early modern Spanish dictionaries to underscore discrepancies in the vocabulary used to describe indigenous healers. Then, using evidence from two sixteenth-century...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 403–404.
Published: 01 April 2019
... three domains of Kaqchikel life—midwifery, soul therapy, and ceremonial dance—each offering a unique perspective on “the enactment of spirit through the lived body” (xviii). The book is organized in four parts. In the first part, Hinojosa defines “soul” in the Comalapan and larger Mesoamerican...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 721–744.
Published: 01 October 2019
... ) and engaged in backstrap loom weaving in the Postclassic codices ( fig. 3 ). ( Ritual of the Bacabs ca. 1779: 197–98.) Another relevant association recognized by scholars working with other Mayan language communities (Prechtel and Carlsen 1988 ) is that of midwifery with weaving. In our interviews...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 203–205.
Published: 01 January 2004
.... The fact that much of the magic under investigation had to do with sex and midwifery is further evidence of the centrality of gender and the control of female bodies to this particular colonial conflict. Women’s private affairs were rendered pub- lic knowledge, as the colonial state sought to inscribe...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 673–687.
Published: 01 October 2005
..., and/or Indian descent. Whenever possible, I offer specific information on race, ethnicity, place of origin, and language spoken. 11 For more on women’s participation in sorcery, magical healing and midwifery, and clandestine religious practices within the context of multiethnic social rela- tions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 673–674.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 675–676.
Published: 01 October 2008
... economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who were heads of households...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 676–678.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 678–679.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 680–681.
Published: 01 October 2008
... economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who were heads of households...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 681–683.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 683–685.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 685–686.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 686–688.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 688–689.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 690–691.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 691–693.
Published: 01 October 2008
... economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who were heads of households...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 693–695.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 695–696.
Published: 01 October 2008
... women played in local and national economies. Like midwifery and market- places, alcohol production and sale—both legal and illicit—was largely the domain of women. Though Reeves never explicitly argues as much, the structural exclusion of women compelled many (particularly those who...