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mestizo

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 525–552.
Published: 01 October 2008
..., the rise of the institution of debt servitude, affecting both indigenous Yucatec Mayan and working-class mestizo populations, and the rise of encompassing political rhetorics of order, progress, and nation building among Porfirian government officials and pueblo-level landowning gentry. El pueblo both...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 663–667.
Published: 01 July 2004
... for centuries. Unlike the writings of scores of other sixteenth-century Spanish, Creole, mestizo, and Amerindian authors whose treatises on the natural wonders of the Indies and the past of local indigenous peoples commanded little attention until recently, Acosta’s History was immedi- ately translated...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 193–194.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Santiago J. Molina Book Reviews 193 Mestizo Genomics: Race Mixture, Nation, and Science in Latin America. Edited by Peter Wade, Carlos López Beltrán, Eduardo Restrepo, and Ricardo Ventura Santos. (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2014. xii...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 371–379.
Published: 01 October 2022
... consider Spanish-authored sources, they nonetheless center attention on the Indigenous subjects and the dynamics created between them and colonial officials. The articles included herein provide a vista on education not only for Natives but also for Mestizos (people of Spanish and Indigenous descent...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 713–738.
Published: 01 October 2012
... it helped further their interests in a society divided between two cultural spheres, Hispanic and indigenous. This article highlights the unique position of sixteenth-century mestizos and mulatos as bearers of indigenous culture and language in colonial Mexico. These individuals born of mixed unions were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 381–400.
Published: 01 October 2022
...Bradley Benton Abstract Children with one Spanish and one Indigenous parent (called mestizos in subsequent generations), particularly from the lower levels of society, were viewed as problematic in the first decades of Spanish rule in New Spain. By the 1550s, colegios had been established to house...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 269–290.
Published: 01 April 2021
... their behavior. When Spanish writers assigned a racial category to the Miskitu, the context of the encounter often shaped perceived racial origin. When Miskitu-Spanish relations were hostile, Spaniards more often chose the racial label sambo . During times of peace, indio was more common, and mestizo...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 263–289.
Published: 01 April 2010
...Michael D. Hill This paper examines the religiously syncretic and culturally hybrid phenomenon of New Age spirituality among urban mestizos in the Cusco region of Peru, primarily through ethnographic analysis of the Urubamba-based Intic Churincuna (Children of the Sun) religious group, along...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 497–518.
Published: 01 July 2016
... narratives functioned as ongoing strategies for reinforcing indigenous peoples’ alterity within the Ecuadorian nation. Specifically, white-mestizo elites discursively framed these crises as historical breaks that necessitated new visions of the country’s future. Rather than bring histories of racial...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 553–578.
Published: 01 October 2008
..., he resisted self-identifying as Maya, which would have compromised his hard-won mestizo status. His rise culminated in the governorship in 1930. White enemies' attacks on García Correa's Maya background helped undo his administration, although his influence over postrevolutionary politics endured...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 689–714.
Published: 01 October 2006
...-Guaraní sociopolitical models demonstrates a process of “Guaranization” that has influenced scholars as much as—if not more than—the Chiriguano themselves. By means of an ethnohistorical analysis of the Chiriguano political system, we attempt to recover the Arawakan heritage of this truly mestizo society...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 397–398.
Published: 01 April 2019
... would become the colony’s standard identity categories— español , indio , negro , mestizo , and mulato —and finds evidence of precocious stereotyping; the authorities tended to view the last three groups as suspect and threatening nearly from the start. Yet this is not primarily a story about...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 454–456.
Published: 01 April 2016
... considers how and why the music of indigenous Bolivians is meaningful for mestizo Bolivian musicians who tour Japan and for the Japanese consumers and producers to whom they market their redeployment of “someone else’s music” (2). A project that grew out of several years of fieldwork in Japan and Bolivia...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 509–524.
Published: 01 October 2008
..., and mestizo power seekers forged modern Mexico. Across the border, Richard Adams (1956: 888, 893–97) proposed stages by which Maya Indians acculturated into Guatemalan Ladino society, later reformulated as a co-evolutionary process instead of a linear progression (Adams 1994: 531). His subsequent...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 503–508.
Published: 01 October 2008
... Indigenous Mestizos: The Politics of Race and Culture in Cuzco, Peru, 1919-1991 . Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Fischer, Edward F., and R. McKenna Brown, eds. 1996 Maya Cultural Activism in Guatemala . Austin: University of Texas Press. Gabbert, Wolfgang 2004 Ethnicity and Social Inequality...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 39–60.
Published: 01 January 2015
... of refuge,” their local identi- ties prevented broad coalitions.3 This fact helped to secure their survival but simultaneously limited their responses. Third, the Huichol selectively adapted elements of nineteenth-­century mestizo society, a fact particularly evident when they reached out...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 435–444.
Published: 01 April 2004
...). Some swap terms like ‘‘Maya ‘‘indigenous or ‘‘ethnic’’ with such socioeconomic designations as ‘‘peasant’’ (or ‘‘campesino and ‘‘rural proletarian Others use ‘‘the term ‘Maya Indians’ irrespective of the fact that it is an obsolete colonial invention’’ (24) or accept mestizo’ as the self...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 219–220.
Published: 01 January 2004
... in central Mexico, Veracruz, and Oaxaca. All of the essays faithfully address the issue of modernization in the region, especially that resulting from economic forces, and its impact on rural peoples, both indigenous and mestizo. With only a couple of excep- tions, the essays are strongly...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 45–64.
Published: 01 January 2023
... of ambiguous ethnic backgrounds and operating outside of particular Indigenous ethnic groups, the methods suggest eclectic influence from the Pacific frontier zone. To summarize, the three cases analyzed here show that whites, Mestizos, and Indigenous people were turning to shamans of ambiguous ethnic...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 649–653.
Published: 01 July 2004
... for centuries. Unlike the writings of scores of other sixteenth-century Spanish, Creole, mestizo, and Amerindian authors whose treatises on the natural wonders of the Indies and the past of local indigenous peoples commanded little attention until recently, Acosta’s History was immedi- ately translated...