1-20 of 734 Search Results for

manuscript

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2006) 53 (3): 629–630.
Published: 01 July 2006
...J. Kathryn Josserand The Madrid Codex: New Approaches to Understanding an Ancient Maya Manuscript. Edited by Gabrielle Vail and Anthony Aveni. (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2004. xviii + 426 pp., foreword, preface, list of abbreviations, 12 articles with individual bibliographies, 109...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2011) 58 (4): 585–611.
Published: 01 October 2011
...Lori Boornazian Diel The Manuscrito del aperreamiento ( Manuscript of the Dogging ), from Cholula ca. 1560, presents a graphic image of a dog attacking a bound indigenous priest. Certainly appalling to modern viewers, the work is often seen as an indictment against the Spaniards pictured. In this...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2013) 60 (4): 749–753.
Published: 01 October 2013
...Mark Z. Christensen Copyright 2013 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2013 The Teabo Manuscript Mark Z. Christensen, Assumption College Of all the colonial Maya texts extant today, the Books of Chilam Balam are the most renowned. Chilam Balams are Maya-­authored manuscripts...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2009) 56 (2): 349–351.
Published: 01 April 2009
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2019) 66 (1): 221–222.
Published: 01 January 2019
...Allen J. Christenson The Teabo Manuscript: Maya Christian Copybooks, Chilam Balams, and Native Text Production in Yucatan . By Mark Z. Christensen . ( Austin : University of Texas Press , 2016 . xv + 321 pp., illustrations, maps, acknowledgments, conclusion, appendix, notes...
Image
Published: 01 April 2016
Figure 1. Last part of the Apostles’ Creed, fols. 11v–12r. Egerton Manuscript 2898, British Museum. © The Trustees of the British Museum Figure 1. Last part of the Apostles’ Creed, fols. 11v–12r. Egerton Manuscript 2898, British Museum. © The Trustees of the British Museum More
Image
Published: 01 April 2016
Figure 3. Section of the Rosary, fols. 23v–24r. Egerton Manuscript 2898, British Museum. © The Trustees of the British Museum Figure 3. Section of the Rosary, fols. 23v–24r. Egerton Manuscript 2898, British Museum. © The Trustees of the British Museum More
Image
Published: 01 October 2016
Figure 2. Comparison of the handwriting of the leather codex, the Canek Manuscript, and the Pintura Manuscript. Author’s diagram Figure 2. Comparison of the handwriting of the leather codex, the Canek Manuscript, and the Pintura Manuscript. Author’s diagram More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2007) 54 (4): 779–781.
Published: 01 October 2007
...John F. Schwaller Tlacuilolli: Style and Contents of the Mexican Pictorial Manuscripts with a Catalog of the Borgia Group. By Karl Anton Nowotny. Translated from the German (1961) and edited by George A. Everett Jr. and Edward B. Sisson. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2005. xxi + 387 pp...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2019) 66 (2): 223–248.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Elena FitzPatrick Sifford Abstract Africans in the Americas were first visually recorded by tlacuiloque , or indigenous artist-scribes, in mid-sixteenth-century Central Mexican manuscripts such as Diego Durán’s History , the Codex Telleriano-Remensis, and the Codex Azcatitlan. These figures, while...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2002) 49 (3): 651–669.
Published: 01 July 2002
...Matthew Restall; John F. Chuchiak, IV This article analyzes the appearance and content of the surviving archival manuscript of the Relación de las cosas de Yucatán, ascribed to Fray Diego de Landa (1524-79), the most prominent of the first generation of Franciscan friars in the Spanish colony of...
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 2. Nearly 700 identified manuscripts are held in archives across twelve cities. Each city is plotted and weighted proportionately according to number of manuscripts it holds, from 1 to 175. Figure 2. Nearly 700 identified manuscripts are held in archives across twelve cities. Each city More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 3. Of the manuscripts plotted in figure 2 , 39 percent are found in Argentina, 25 percent in Brazil, 26 percent in Iberia, and 10 percent in Uruguay. Seventeen percent have been transcribed and published. Figure 3. Of the manuscripts plotted in figure 2, 39 percent are found in More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 4. More than five hundred manuscripts report locations of autonomous Indigenous agents, yet each present-day archival city exhibits a limited territorial vantage point concentrated on colonial settlements. Figure 4. More than five hundred manuscripts report locations of autonomous More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2015) 62 (3): 497–524.
Published: 01 July 2015
... book over a fifteen-year period from 1550 to 1564. This article presents some preliminary findings on the interrelationship between the manuscript's pictorial and alphabetic texts as well as observations about its language. The findings are part of a forthcoming transcription, translation, and analysis...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2015) 62 (3): 469–495.
Published: 01 July 2015
...Kathryn E. Sampeck This article will explore how Pipil writing compares to better-known Central Mexican pictorial manuscripts. The sole evidence for preconquest writing in this region was presented in the seventeenth century by Don Francisco Antonio de Fuentes y Guzmán through his drawings and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2010) 57 (1): 51–72.
Published: 01 January 2010
...Kevin Terraciano A sixteenth-century manuscript known as the Florentine Codex is an outstanding example of graphic pluralism in early colonial Mexico. The codex consists of twelve books on many aspects of Nahua culture and language, presented in parallel columns of Nahuatl- and Castilian-language...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2010) 57 (1): 165–173.
Published: 01 January 2010
...Sabine Hyland According to the anonymous seventeenth-century author of the Quito Manuscript, ancient Andeans once possessed a writing system ( qillqa ) that they replaced with knotted strings ( khipu ) as part of the religious and sexual reform of their nation. The manuscript's redactor, Fernando...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2017) 64 (2): 241–270.
Published: 01 April 2017
... Popol Vuh within its historical and physical ecclesiastic context, recovering Friar Ximénez’s voice within his manuscript. It is argued that his work was first and foremost intended to be a religious treatise to carry out the conversion of the K’iche’ to Christianity. This study offers an alternative...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2019) 66 (3): 465–487.
Published: 01 July 2019
... geográficas (RG) manuscripts. As a methodological intervention, the principal aim is to draw out the relatively understudied Indigenous knowledges and practices found throughout the corpus. The first section of the essay outlines the conceptual framework of technologies and contextualizes the RG survey and...