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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 5. Revised linguistic map of western Honduras. Figure 5. Revised linguistic map of western Honduras. More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 1. Past reconstructions of the Ch’orti’ linguistic frontier in western Honduras. Figure 1. Past reconstructions of the Ch’orti’ linguistic frontier in western Honduras. More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2008) 55 (3): 417–438.
Published: 01 July 2008
...Juan Luis Rodriguez This essay will discuss contending language ideologies in early twentieth-century efforts at translating Warao into Spanish. It will analyze the linguistic and semiotic collision between the Warao and the emerging Venezuelan nation-state. Its main focus will be on the Catholic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2019) 66 (2): 301–328.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Figure 5. Revised linguistic map of western Honduras. Figure 5. Revised linguistic map of western Honduras. ...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2016) 63 (3): 541–570.
Published: 01 July 2016
..., linguistic, archaeological, and genetic data supports recent linguistic and archaeological inquiries into protohistoric Kiowa origins suggesting a presence, if not migration, of Kiowa speakers along the western Rocky Mountains from the Colorado Plateau to the northwestern plains. Scholars are beginning to...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2005) 52 (2): 333–369.
Published: 01 April 2005
... Cofitachequi were one of a number of tribes that spoke Catawban, and that the Catawba were an equal and integral part of a linguistic community rather than a subject people. American Society for Ethnohistory 2005 Adair, James 1930 [1775] Adair's History of the American Indians . Samuel Cole...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2007) 54 (2): 245–272.
Published: 01 April 2007
... idea that linguistic relatedness is a conduit for the transmission of culture across all speakers and through time. What is problematic is that the classification of South American peoples on the basis of language was a product of European exploration. When the documents are read for what they tell us...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2007) 54 (3): 407–443.
Published: 01 July 2007
...) reflected an understanding of the power and danger of the encounter that the actual experience confirmed. In this, it reminds us that there are several layers of interpretation—linguistic, religious, and ideological—that need to be taken into account when assessing these encounters. Also by incorporating...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2007) 54 (3): 509–546.
Published: 01 July 2007
... belief that a real Indian subject lies behind these texts in any straightforward sense. To make this argument, I draw on linguistic anthropology and critical theory, analyzing firsthand accounts, newspaper reports, and descriptions of Indian speech and Nez Perce history. American Society for...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2008) 55 (3): 465–490.
Published: 01 July 2008
... task in culture history is to classify native so-called tribes into cultural and/or linguistic categories, to list defining cultural traits, and to show how these “tribes” have persisted, disappeared, or become acculturated. The essential task in social history is to reconstruct the structure of the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2015) 62 (4): 729–750.
Published: 01 October 2015
...Benjamin Hoy Throughout the nineteenth century, Canada and the United States struggled to gain accurate demographic data on the First Nations and Métis communities they claimed to oversee. Enumerators grappled with linguistic and cultural differences, distrust, the ambiguity of racial categories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2015) 62 (3): 651–674.
Published: 01 July 2015
... New Philology and on recent trends in missionary linguistics, this article explores the distinctive characteristics of alphabetic writing, which was a potent force in reshaping Maya communicative practices. I argue that the flexibility, portability, and universal applicability of the graphic alphabet...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2011) 58 (2): 263–291.
Published: 01 April 2011
... majority of ethnoscientific and linguistic studies. This article illustrates the value of adhering to the scholarly method of reliance upon weighted evidence in order to achieve congruent results between multiple types of research data. Copyright 2011 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2011...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2012) 59 (1): 79–107.
Published: 01 January 2012
... economic interests of European colonizers since 1492. Beginning with the first voyages of Columbus, the Carib were portrayed as warlike cannibals who raided the “peaceful” natives of the Greater Antilles. Carib-French contacts in the seventeenth century recorded origin myths and linguistic evidence that...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2014) 61 (1): 149–179.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Justyna Olko This article examines several key gestures and postures documented in the early postconquest Nahua world: the eating of earth, squatting and kneeling, prostration, bowing, and finger pointing. Combining distinct genres of sources, ranging from linguistic evidence to iconographic data...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2012) 59 (4): 713–738.
Published: 01 October 2012
... article analyzes how these individuals served as more than just intermediaries between each cultural space. It suggests that mestizos and mulatos were much more prominent cultural actors than has generally been assumed. Their linguistic and cultural fluency helped shaped many aspects of New Spain's...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2019) 66 (2): 275–300.
Published: 01 April 2019
..., alternatively fought and aligned with neighboring groups, and resisted the advance of colonial settlers. However, little is known about the remote past of these resilient peoples, who became mounted foragers in the early 1600s. A careful review of historical, ethnographic, and linguistic records on Tobas around...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2019) 66 (2): 353–384.
Published: 01 April 2019
... from the Tseshaht First Nation. His eldest son, Alex Thomas, sold these drawings to linguistic anthropologist Edward Sapir, who was at the time in charge of the anthropology division of the Geological Survey of Canada. The drawings depict critically important cultural information about ceremonial...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2018) 65 (4): 677–678.
Published: 01 October 2018
..., maps, notes, references, index . $35.00 cloth.) Copyright 2018 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2018 This book is based on a little-known article—published in German by Heinrich Berghaus in 1851—that offered an early ethnographic and linguistic view of the Comanche nation. The...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2018) 65 (4): 684–685.
Published: 01 October 2018
... at a 2011 international symposium—dedicated to what is often termed “missionary linguistics,” which involves the transmission of Christianity into native languages. Each essay in the volume is dedicated to a linguistic analysis of this transmission into a wide variety of languages throughout the...