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law and recognition

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (2): 135–152.
Published: 01 April 2023
...Yanna Yannakakis Abstract This article addresses the opportunities and challenges for researching the history of Indigenous custom during a period in which constitutional and legal reform have led to the recognition of customary law as an official framework for local governance...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 697–720.
Published: 01 October 2016
... and shifting. Not only did it facilitate royal efforts to constrain conqueror claims to native wealth, it also contributed to the eventual recognition of native patrimonial lands in Spanish imperial law. Copyright 2016 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2016 native peoples Nahuas Mexico law...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 January 2019
... . Barker Joanne . 2011 . Native Acts: Law, Recognition, and Cultural Authenticity . Durham, NC : Duke University Press . Barsh Russell Lawrence , and Henderson J. Youngblood . 1976 . “ Tribal Courts, the Model Code, and the Police Idea in American Indian Policy .” Law...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 505–536.
Published: 01 July 2013
... (Emmons 1991: 52–53). Further, he viewed chiefs, or leaders of the respective clans and groups, as the rightful persons to uphold those laws, and so it was sensible to provide support through recognition of their position. Upon taking over from Beardslee in 1882, Commander Glass wrote that all...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 191–213.
Published: 01 April 2021
... of compositional flexibility shapes tribal politics and is at odds with many forms of traditional governance systems. Copyright 2021 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2021 American Indians Native North America settler colonialism anthropological theory law and recognition I feel like I don’t...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 37–63.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., and Paul Chartrand 2002 Who Are the Métis of Section 35? A Review of the Law and Policy Relating to Métis and “Mixed-Blood” People in Canada. In Who are Canada's Aboriginal Peoples? Recognition, Definition, and Jurisdiction . Paul Chartrand, ed. Pp. 83 –125. Saskatoon, SK: Purich Publishing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 473–494.
Published: 01 July 2001
... Louisiana . New Brunswick,nj: Rutgers University Press. Douma, E. C., and J. W. Whitehead 1976 The Houma Indians: Two Decades in the History of a Struggle. American Indian Journal 2 (3): 2 -18. Duthu, N. Bruce 1997 The Houma Indians of Louisiana:The Intersection of Law and History...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 183–201.
Published: 01 April 2008
... of the Haudenosaunee to Criminal Justice Jurisdiction in Canada: A Preliminary Inquiry . Master's thesis, Simon Fraser University. Culhane, Dara 1998 The Pleasure of the Crown: Anthropology, Law, and First Nations . Burnaby, BC: Talonbooks. Deskaheh 1924 The Redman's Appeal for Justice . Brantford...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (2): 153–165.
Published: 01 April 2023
... on its own terms. On the other, the lawyer-historian gaze may provide critical insight into the workings of the law in past processes of privatization and commodification of Indigenous lands. Legal training better equips historians for understanding the technical details of land transactions, lawmaking...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 69–89.
Published: 01 January 2009
... officials therefore sought, with limited success, to extend effective control over Maori districts through the Resi- dent Magistrates system introduced after 1846, through cautious efforts to give some limited recognition to Maori customs within the framework of the law, and by various other...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 779–791.
Published: 01 October 2004
... Nation’s (UHN’s) long-time attempt to secure federal recognition. Davis marshals an impressive body of historical and ethnological data to support his argument. In this commentary, we ques- tion his data and sources. Inasmuch as the anthropological code of ethics calls for transparency...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 743–767.
Published: 01 October 2002
.... Jackson, Jason 1995 Continuity of Yuchi Ceremonial Grounds. Report submitted to the Branch of Acknowledgment and Recognition , Bureau of Indian Affairs, in response to the bureau's deficiency letter concerning the 1990 Yuchi petition for acknowledgment. January. 1996a “Everybody Has a Part; Even...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 331–332.
Published: 01 April 2011
.... In Seeking Recognition, he turns his attention to the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw of Oregon, whose sovereignty eroded rapidly in the nineteenth century, was terminated in 1956, and then was restored in 1984. The first part of the book examines Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Sius- law culture...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 423–447.
Published: 01 July 2009
... makers reified this survival strategy by naming these “full-blooded” and less assimilated Indians as the lawful heirs of Article 14 claimants. Choctaws were quick to take advantage of this convergence of official recognition and self-identification and assert their political identity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 419–444.
Published: 01 July 2014
... into American society be regarded as the key to addressing social inequity, or would prosperity come from a push toward cultural and political autonomy and the recognition of treaty-­reserved rights? Should the Office of Indian Affairs (OIA) be eliminated, or could it become a part- ner in advancing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 323–324.
Published: 01 April 2011
.... In Seeking Recognition, he turns his attention to the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw of Oregon, whose sovereignty eroded rapidly in the nineteenth century, was terminated in 1956, and then was restored in 1984. The first part of the book examines Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Sius- law culture...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 325–326.
Published: 01 April 2011
.... In Seeking Recognition, he turns his attention to the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw of Oregon, whose sovereignty eroded rapidly in the nineteenth century, was terminated in 1956, and then was restored in 1984. The first part of the book examines Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Sius- law culture...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 326–328.
Published: 01 April 2011
.... In Seeking Recognition, he turns his attention to the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw of Oregon, whose sovereignty eroded rapidly in the nineteenth century, was terminated in 1956, and then was restored in 1984. The first part of the book examines Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Sius- law culture...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 328–329.
Published: 01 April 2011
.... In Seeking Recognition, he turns his attention to the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw of Oregon, whose sovereignty eroded rapidly in the nineteenth century, was terminated in 1956, and then was restored in 1984. The first part of the book examines Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Sius- law culture...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 329–331.
Published: 01 April 2011
... of the current dispute with the Cherokee Nation over federal recognition of the Delaware Tribe, Obermeyer reveals the nuances of both change and continuity in the Dela- ware community. Acting as participant and observer from 2001 to 2004, the author attended Delaware community events like the Delaware Pow...