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indigenous soldiers

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 381–413.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., this article extends the previously limited nature of our understanding of indigenous soldiers in the Spanish Pacific, focusing in particular on the problem of what motivated indigenous people to join the Spanish military. The existing historiography of reward structures among indigenous elites is here coupled...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 416–417.
Published: 01 July 2023
...James Mestaz j_mestaz@yahoo.com Soldiers, Saints, and Shamans: Indigenous Communities and the Revolutionary State in Mexico’s Gran Nayar, 1910–1940 . By Nathaniel Morris . ( Tucson : University of Arizona Press , 2020 . ix + 371 pp., abbreviations, illustrations, notes, bibliography...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 329–352.
Published: 01 April 2019
... engaged with Spanish mediation between Indigenous peoples. As this article demonstrates, missionaries and soldiers brokered Indigenous peace agreements to protect overland communication between Sonora and Alta California and stake out a role for the empire in the river region. In turn, Native peoples...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 3–25.
Published: 01 January 2024
... environment to resist removal and the loss of territory. Taking Seminole movement, home construction, and language and placing it in dialogue with sources from soldiers and settlers involved in the wars, this article reveals a new facet of Indigenous resistance to colonial violence, rooted in relationships...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 549–573.
Published: 01 October 2018
... Peter , and Iversen Margaret , eds. 1998 . Cannibalism and the Colonial World . New York : Cambridge University Press . Bieber Judy . 2014 . “ Mediation through Militarization: Indigenous Soldiers and Transcultural Middlemen of the Rio Doce Divisions, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 1808...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 271–296.
Published: 01 April 2017
... of military conquest or religious conversion, using inflammatory rhetoric to justify violent force against native “assaults,” “invasions,” and “infestations.” However, military reports from Cuieté document few indigenous instigators. In confrontations with soldiers, Jê peoples typically fared badly, suffering...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 385–404.
Published: 01 July 2023
..., but few of these studies consider those Indigenous soldiers who were conscripted and served against their will. In places like Oaxaca, where approximately two-thirds of the total population was Indigenous, local Indigenous authorities utilized the armed forces—and conscription in particular—to physically...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 497–518.
Published: 01 July 2016
....). As with the Paquisha War, national media and politicians celebrated indigenous soldiers and communities near the area of fighting for their efforts to defend the country. The Iwia and Arutam brigades involved in the conflict (comprising Shuar- and Quichua-speaking soldiers led by white-mestizo officers) 6 were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 293–316.
Published: 01 April 2004
... that the White’s bullets would not penetrate their followers, and a consider- able number of warriors responded to the call to take the warpath. Five hundred Guaycuruans attacked San Javier de Mocobis, but the Argentine army defeated the believers. The soldier’s firearms proved to the indigenous people...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 January 2013
... was to allow starvation and nature's elements to kill the Tlingit survivors of the attack. The conflict transpired fifteen months after Russia sold Alaska to the United States and as the US Army was dispatched to Alaska to oversee its resources, lands, and indigenous population—an undertaking resisted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 255–289.
Published: 01 April 2005
... these actions clearly departed from the avowedly benevolent purposes of official indigenous policy. Another such incident in 1769 occurred after Governor José Luís de Meneses Abranches Castello Branco e Noronha ordered Captain Antonio Cardozo de Souza and the soldiers comprising his bandeira to explore...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 113–138.
Published: 01 January 2024
... of soldiers sent to collect firewood was ambushed by Indigenous people still apparently living in a toldo. The soldiers killed eight indios and took more captive. Describing one of these survivors, he writes, “The prisoners are in the highest state of poverty, completely naked and without any more food than...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 229–251.
Published: 01 April 2014
... fled into the hills, others drowned as they tried to swim away, and some were hunted down and beheaded in skirmishes with Spanish and indigenous soldiers. The Japanese residents of Manila tended to stand with the Spaniards and together, with indigenous allies, they dismantled all major stone...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 621–645.
Published: 01 October 2018
... and political organization. Following Hal Langfur, we can term this general making of spaces a re-territorialization. Critical social relations include those between Amerindian ethnic entities and their leaders, soldiers, and missionaries. This article focuses on a key spatial relation between Amerindian...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 223–248.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Elena FitzPatrick Sifford Abstract Africans in the Americas were first visually recorded by tlacuiloque , or indigenous artist-scribes, in mid-sixteenth-century Central Mexican manuscripts such as Diego Durán’s History , the Codex Telleriano-Remensis, and the Codex Azcatitlan. These figures, while...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 671–695.
Published: 01 October 2016
... of points made from iron obtained from the Spaniards (Vargas Machuca 1892 , 1:37–38). To prevail against the Amerindians, Vargas Machuca argued that it was necessary to adopt indigenous warfare strategies (1:43–44). Conquest expeditions needed to recruit experienced soldiers, ideally between fifteen...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 261–291.
Published: 01 April 2012
..., that text and his other writings have received comparatively little attention from scholars despite the rich opportunities these documents hold for exploring the indigenous world of his day. Much of the neglect stems from a reluctance to accept him as a “real” native person because he was born in Scotland...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 217–239.
Published: 01 April 2017
... more to do with imperialist opportunism than with an adequate understanding of indigenous ethnic markers. This is neither the first time nor the last that both native informants and Spanish officials report knowing that Agueybana’s soldiers sustained a direct alliance with the “Caribs,” who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 338–339.
Published: 01 April 2018
....) Copyright 2018 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2018 “On a hot day in May 1887, a group of Bolivian soldiers halted their march across a flat savanna laced by lakes and tributaries of the Amazon. They were taking ten indigenous prisoners back to their headquarters in Trinidad, the local capital...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 755–758.
Published: 01 October 2013
... conquistador. From the American Geographical Society Library, University of Wisconsin-­Milwaukee The next section of the lienzo is dedicated to the conquest and arrival of colonial rule. To the left of the seventh pre-­Hispanic ruling couple, we see a soldier standing in front of an indigenous...