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indigenous health decline

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 205–225.
Published: 01 January 2000
... for the fertility of the universe in which the health of people and the land reflected the state of moral order in Huli society. Failure in social behaviour, which could be gauged from the declining condition of the “skin” of the land, was attributed to an inexorable process of loss of the knowledge of customary...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 April 2015
... for Ethnohistory 2015 Indian Territory indigenous health indigenous foodways Five Tribes diabetes indigenous health decline traditional foods Sustenance and Health among the Five Tribes in Indian Territory, Postremoval to Statehood Devon A. Mihesuah, University of Kansas Abstract...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 407–427.
Published: 01 July 2021
... in the community. The younger storytellers did not comment on cooking with Indigenous corn. The decline in growing, harvesting, cooking, and consuming traditional foods had an impact on the overall health of the Oneida people. Jessie Peters noted that the older generation warned him about straying from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 309–331.
Published: 01 April 2015
... marriage as a means of controlling Indian sexual expression (see Burkhart 1989: 156–58), and secular authorities may have seen it as a possible brake on population decline. The RG laments about earlier marriage clearly reflect an indigenous viewpoint. The idea that sexual intercourse...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 April 2021
... of their communities. Native priests and healers, men and women who helped to ensure good health and harvests, were likely nobles, elders, and other respected members of society. The rapid decline of this group within two or three generations represented irretrievable culture loss. One response from a Mixe...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 423–424.
Published: 01 April 2016
...—in all its manifold yet connected aspects—has negatively impacted indigenous health and well-being” (173). References Crosby Alfred 1976 “ Virgin Soil Epidemics as a Factor in the Aboriginal Depopulation in America .” William and Mary Quarterly 33 , no. 2 : 289 – 99 . Diamond...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (1): 69–121.
Published: 01 January 2002
... 1985: 250; Reff 1987: 92). The consequences of the substantial depopulation that accompanied severe epidemics after 1769 extended far beyond economic and health concerns to shatter the entire fabric of indigenous...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 January 2005
... in the Americas (detailed by Alchon in the appendix), and now future research needs to be undertaken to understand indigenous conceptions of health and illness and practices of healing in general, particularly in response to epidemic disease, both before and after 1492. It would also be important to consider...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 198–200.
Published: 01 January 2005
... in the Americas (detailed by Alchon in the appendix), and now future research needs to be undertaken to understand indigenous conceptions of health and illness and practices of healing in general, particularly in response to epidemic disease, both before and after 1492. It would also be important to consider...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 200–201.
Published: 01 January 2005
... in the Americas (detailed by Alchon in the appendix), and now future research needs to be undertaken to understand indigenous conceptions of health and illness and practices of healing in general, particularly in response to epidemic disease, both before and after 1492. It would also be important to consider...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 35–67.
Published: 01 January 2009
... context. It considers the blockade not as a manifestation of inherent indigenous environmentality but as a complex phenomenon predicated on Anishinaabe people's desires for self-determination, recognition of rights, and the power to decide what takes place on land they perceive as theirs. More broadly...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 721–744.
Published: 01 October 2019
... to the knowledge of colonial Yucatec Maya women through the interpretation of documentary evidence of three indigenous rites meant to facilitate women’s perinatal health and successful childbirth. This evidence is contained in the eighteenth-century collection of healing chants known as the “ritual of the bacabs...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 371–406.
Published: 01 April 2005
... Health and Welfare Records, National Archives of Canada. Gilman, Sander 1985 Difference and Pathology: Stereotypes of Race, Sexuality, and Madness . Ithaca,NY: Cornell University Press. Hall, G. Stanley 1903 The White Man's Burden versus Indigenous Development for the Lower Races. Proceedings...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 609–632.
Published: 01 October 2008
..., and many Tzeltal and Tzotzil indigenous communities, the INI employed bilingual indigenous “cultural promoters” to negotiate its programs in education, road construction, and public health. As it turns out, the INI's most innovative negotiating tool was a bilingual hand-puppet troupe, the Teatro Petul...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 623–645.
Published: 01 October 2019
... ethnographic studies on the nature of health in indigenous communities. In both colonial and modern sources, Nahuas draw little distinction between emotional and physical ailments (see Cruz de la Cruz, this issue). Although centuries separate these two sets of sources, there are some fascinating similarities...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 543–544.
Published: 01 July 2001
... demonstrates the role of the convent in the reproduction of social power and prestige and, in the process, contributes to our under- standing of gender, family life, marriage, and motherhood. The organization of the book outlines the founding, growth, crisis, and decline of this spiritual economy...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 47–68.
Published: 01 January 2003
...Patricia Fournier-García; Lourdes Mondragón During the colonial period, Indian republics were formed as were private holdings in the Otomí region of the Mezquital Valley. The indigenous population was deprived of fertile agricultural lands while ranchos and haciendas raised cattle, affecting...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 225–262.
Published: 01 April 2010
... at Santa Catalina were not reproducing at replacement rates, other factors could conceivably be at play. As direct colonial involvement in the mission declined in the 1820s and 1830s, it is possible that indigenous fami- lies no longer had their children baptized or left the mission...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 257–258.
Published: 01 January 2000
.... O’Brien traces the decline of Natick, Massachusetts, as a distinctly Indian place between1650 and1790. Combining insights from the field of ethnohistory with the best qualities of the New England town study, O’Brien has produced...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 259–260.
Published: 01 January 2000
... cloth.) Michael Leroy Oberg, SUNY-Geneseo 5996 Ethnohistory / 47:1 / sheet 261 of 281 In Dispossession by Degrees, author Jean M. O’Brien traces the decline of Natick, Massachusetts, as a distinctly Indian place between1650 and1790...