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illnesses

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 571–596.
Published: 01 October 2010
... responded to the windigo, as colonial authorities created narratives around this disorder designed to increase their control over Cree and Ojibwa communities. American Society for Ethnohistory 2010 Spirit Beings, Mental Illness, and Murder: Fur Traders and the Windigo in Canada’s Boreal Forest...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 385–405.
Published: 01 July 2021
...Oriol Ambrogio Abstract This article examines accusations of sorcery as a way to understand the perceptions of sorcery among the Mapuche of central-southern Chile during the colonial period. Local communities believed that illnesses and unfortunate events were caused by the actions of sorcerers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 673–687.
Published: 01 October 2005
... vehicle of women's ritual power, used as the basis for magical potions to cast supernatural illness, in sexual witchcraft practices, and even, at times, as a flash point for women's disorderly behavior in public settings. The gendered associations of chocolate with ritual power and disorder in Guatemala...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (3): 445–472.
Published: 01 July 2007
... entangled with development and its benefits and ills, which have prompted debate over how to build a “modern” town in the highlands. American Society for Ethnohistory 2007 Allen, Bryant, and Stephen Frankel 1991 Across the Tari Furoro. In Like People You See in a Dream: First Contact in Six...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 647–666.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Sabina Cruz de la Cruz; Rebecca Dufendach Abstract Sabina Cruz de la Cruz presents an auto-ethnohistory, an account written in her native language of Nahuatl based on her community experiences with illness and curing in the Huasteca region of Veracruz, Mexico. She documents her work with two...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 April 2015
... to a vast array of fruits, vegetables, and game meats, and until the Civil War, their health problems appeared to be maladies such as wounds, parasites, contagious diseases, and illnesses associated with unsanitary conditions. Around the mid-1860s, natives' diets began changing in two ways: either...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (3): 515–540.
Published: 01 July 2012
..., the Navajo Nation, the largest Native American nation in the United States, was one of the last holdouts against gaming until quite recently. Some Navajos voiced concerns over the danger of compromising sovereignty through state gaming compacts. Others feared that gaming would attract social ills...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 623–645.
Published: 01 October 2019
... cultural concepts of illness. This article uses colonial and modern ethnographic sources to illuminate enduring Mesoamerican concepts of health and sickness. The chaos and loss of life connected to the first epidemic in 1520 contributed significantly to the fall of Tenochtitlan. This article reveals how...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 27–45.
Published: 01 January 2024
... remained influential locally because commoners perceived their ceremonies to be efficacious. Ritual specialists used their advanced knowledge of medicine and spirituality to alleviate illnesses like dysentery, fever, and typhoid. Concern for ailing family members prompted Natives to take an inclusive...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 63–86.
Published: 01 January 2024
... arrived at acceptable contingency plans when faced with illness and argues that community responses to smallpox helped ease factional tensions. Iksa (moiety) obligations for funeral rites—embodying the notion of iyyi kowa (generosity)—bridged political differences, accounting for a period of collaboration...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (3): 473–508.
Published: 01 July 2007
... pushed the bison farther west, destroyed or claimed grass and wood, peddled whiskey, and brought more disease to the tribe. This was the legacy of the Euro-American frontier, and its consequences for the Kaw included starvation, illness, death, warfare, Ethnohistory 54:3 (Summer 2007)  doi...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 441–463.
Published: 01 July 2018
... the discussion of Nahua healers in Western terms and pigeonholed female titiçih as midwives, though he added curing eye illnesses to the “realm of women.” Mónica Guadalupe Andalón González’s “El tícitl en la cultura náhuatl del Posclásico” ( 2016 ) relied heavily on the work of Treviño Viesca and reiterated...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 143–148.
Published: 01 January 2011
... these events and con- tribute to their differentiation of humanity into Navajo and non-Navajo categories. Historical experiences of disease have taught them to divide pathologies into ancient ills best treated through traditional healing and new disorders that come from contact...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 45–71.
Published: 01 January 2004
... of the most important processes in colonial history. When Europeans andAfricanscametotheAmericas,theybroughtwiththemamultitude of pathogenic microbes that Native Americans had never before experi- enced. Lacking acquired immunity to many common illnesses, Indians suffered from virgin-soil epidemics of many...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 355–394.
Published: 01 July 2009
... vocal sounds.20 None of these symptoms is exclusive to witiko, and the manifestation of these conditions, An Ethnohistory of “Cannibal Monsters” in Northern Alberta 361 in any permutation or combination, could be diagnostic of a wide variety of psychiatric or physiological illnesses...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 45–64.
Published: 01 January 2023
... continuing an enduring system of spirituality. Shamans used techniques such as long sessions of chanting, consumption of alcohol and tobacco, and manipulation of sacred plants and objects in their attempts to master spirits and defeat illness-agents and malevolent forces. Two of the shamans discussed here...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 465–487.
Published: 01 July 2019
..., if understood, and the common illnesses and the remedies they tend to use to treat them.” The second, question 26, requests information on “The herbs and aromatic plants used by the Indians to cure, and the medicinal or poisonous properties of them.” The Archdiocese of Mexico corpus alone contains attestations...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (2): 223–232.
Published: 01 April 2022
.../1pP-pursue-ds-ha FZA/1pP-bear ill-will-ha the it regularly pursues us it bears us ill-will He is discouraging those that are spirits of our enemy that regularly pursues us and bears us ill-will. ,ato,en aat son,8entenri d‘ ,a-to,en son,8-entenr-i FZA-be true+st MA/1pP...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 677–700.
Published: 01 October 2004
... at once, or else she’ll come to life again, and we shall all fare ill.’4 What can we learn from these stories? On first glance it seems that the French-Canadian voyageurs who chose to spend their lives in the pays d’en haut (which literally translates as ‘‘the upper country adopted the cultural...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 3–25.
Published: 01 January 2024
... these illnesses took such a toll on Indigenous peoples was because they were “virgin soil” for pathogens; having never experienced smallpox, no one in their communities or villages was immune, so smallpox—or measles, or the flu, or any other highly contagious viral pathogen—infected whole through communities...
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