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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 January 2006
...Pascal James Imperato Iconic geographic spaces come into being because they are unique and offer opportunities for self-challenge and accomplishment. Lake Rudolf (Lake Turkana) in East Africa has been such an iconic space during the precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial eras. While a number of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 1–28.
Published: 01 January 2020
... and misrepresentation of indigenous women, using Pocahontas and Malinche as examples of distorted icons, referencing the hidden history of the sixteenth-century trade in indigenous sex slaves in the Caribbean and Mesoamerica, and arguing that the Armed Freedom statue atop the US Capitol Building is an...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 175–182.
Published: 01 January 2010
... consumption) reveal and enact social relationships and inequalities. The author reminds readers that to fully explore the rich implications of the graphic, scholars must expand their investigations beyond writing's capacity to represent spoken language and also investigate the iconic and indexical dimensions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 573–595.
Published: 01 July 2015
...” ( tħan ); “written character” ( uoh ); and “icon” ( uayasba ). Copyright 2015 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2015 literacy semiotics performance medical anthropology Maya hieroglyphs References Arzápalo Marín Ramón 1987 El Ritual de los bacabes: Edición facsimilar con...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 749–750.
Published: 01 October 2003
... literature, orga- nizations, and fiestas in urban bourgeois spirituality and another on the meaning and politics of popular icons in rural Yucatán. Finally, he explores the emergence of popular anticlericalism and spiritualism, from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 356–357.
Published: 01 April 2021
... Christians (107). Soormally contends that these newly founded Christian societies needed outcasts and idolaters to differentiate the haves from the have-nots, which led to the creation of a state reliant on marginalized subalterns (118). Chapter 4 reevaluates the iconic tale of the Virgen de Guadalupe and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 October 2017
... technique of blues guitarists and the pedal steel guitars typical of country music. The electric guitar, perhaps the most iconic instrument in American popular music, developed from the Hawaiian guitar—when the electric guitar’s inventors applied for a patent in 1934, Ho‘opi‘i traveled to Washington, DC, to...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 3–11.
Published: 01 January 2006
... committed sui- cide.1 Von Höhnel’s descriptions of his first gaze on the lake, which he pro- duced in his book Discovery of Lakes Rudolf and Stefanie (1968), ‘‘created Lake Rudolf as an iconic colonial space’’ (Mirzeler 2002:152), drawing the attention of various European colonial powers and elephant...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 323–325.
Published: 01 April 2018
... new lands and peoples into his conceptual universe. Through his writing, Benzoni transformed first impressions into lasting and iconic images: above all, the native savage—not noble (except in resisting the Spaniards), stubbornly attached to unchristian and uncivilized ways, and ultimately unequal to...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 385–386.
Published: 01 April 2015
... nineteenth century, Freeman had become a sort of local icon—the “last of her kind” in Chester County—and a symbol of Quaker benevolence toward a vanishing people. Unfortunately, it is not always clear where cer- tain assertions come from. For example, Marsh claims that Freeman was a medicine woman...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 173–174.
Published: 01 January 2016
... native rights, as a founder of the NMAI, as a writer and poet, and, of course, for taking on the Washington Redskins. Fol- lowing her introduction, a series of core essays lays out the landscape of treaties, treaty making, and treaty rights. Robert Clinton reflects on Indian treaties as “iconic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 721–744.
Published: 01 October 2019
.... 2018 . “ Flame, Icons, and Healing: A Colonial Maya Ontology .” Colonial Latin American Review 28 , no. 3 : 392 – 412 . Kufer Johanna , and McNeil Cameron L. 2006 . “ The Jaguar Tree ( Theobroma bicolor Bonpl.) .” In Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 523–525.
Published: 01 July 2001
... magnificent work, both in the meticulousness of its scholarly exe- cution and in the quality of its editorial production. Even more than these achievements, it makes available a study of the European encounter with native America that is iconic, that foreshadows an entire genre of literatures and cultural...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (4): 635–653.
Published: 01 October 2014
... the knowl- edge of what this statue is sparks a complete disjuncture between history and place. For those unfamiliar with this iconic figure, Massasoit attained fame as the sachem of the Pokanoket people who encountered, and then bro- kered, decades of peace with the invading English on Cape Cod...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (2): 407–410.
Published: 01 April 2003
... the context of long-lived church debates over popular religious devotion. The extent to which practices—whether in Europe or the Americas—focusing on icons and images should or should not be encouraged was intensely...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 747–749.
Published: 01 October 2003
..., and fiestas in urban bourgeois spirituality and another on the meaning and politics of popular icons in rural Yucatán. Finally, he explores the emergence of popular anticlericalism and spiritualism, from the mid– to late...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 525–527.
Published: 01 July 2001
... with native America that is iconic, that foreshadows an entire genre of literatures and cultural idioms concerned with ‘‘savage captivity and that critically has continuing implications for a better understanding of Spanish colonial- ism in Florida (the territory north of the borders of New Spain...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 119–143.
Published: 01 January 2015
... research focuses on the historical and ongoing example of mascot contention at the University of Illinois, focused on the Fighting Illini and their icon, Chief Illiniwek. Though the dancing sideline performer known as Chief Illiniwek has been retired by UI, its ghost still is felt and pined for by...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2010
... uncomfortably throws together inscriptions whose systems of reference are similar but which differ in myriad other ways: systems of sign syntax, transient versus permanent signing, iconic or noniconic repre- sentation, standardizing versus esthetically innovating norms of inscription, and so on. Further...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 485–504.
Published: 01 July 2013
... Kalifornsky and found it apparent that Kalifornsky held two cosmologies in his head. As a devoted Orthodox, Kalifornsky regularly attended church and had icons and a bible in his home. But when writing Dena’ina Resistance to Russian Hegemony 497 or talking about the old ways...