1-20 of 508 Search Results for

horse

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 4. Panel two at Cheval Bonnet with Blackfoot-style horse and human. Lines at upper right may originally have been a horse, now too eroded to identify. Illustration by author from on-site tracing by author Figure 4. Panel two at Cheval Bonnet with Blackfoot-style horse and human. Lines More
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 9. Blackfoot-style horses are much more angular and have a different head and neck configuration than those identified as Crow. They are typically associated with humans presented in rectangular, V-neck, or hourglass-body style. Illustration by author from on-site tracings by author More
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 6. Panel 1 at Cheval Bonnet shows two horses, each wearing a feather warbonnet. Illustration by author from on-site tracing by author Figure 6. Panel 1 at Cheval Bonnet shows two horses, each wearing a feather warbonnet. Illustration by author from on-site tracing by author More
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 11. Crow horses drawn after approximately AD 1860: a, bison robe in Danish National Museum, Copenhagen; b, d, e, Joliet site, Montana; c, Musselshell site (24ML1049). Illustration by author Figure 11. Crow horses drawn after approximately AD 1860: a, bison robe in Danish National Museum More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 269–293.
Published: 01 April 2013
... of Blackfoot territory. When the Civil War interrupted the payment of treaty annuities in 1863, young Blackfoot men increasingly targeted horses belonging to whites in their raids. The raids had been deployed as a compensatory mechanism meant to restore balance for trespasses against the Blackfoot, a strategy...
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 8. Crow indicators in rock art. These include the elongated, fluidly posed humans with modeled thighs and calves (a, b, d); horses with high, arched necks (c, d, e); and horses wearing feather bonnets (d, e). Illustration by author Figure 8. Crow indicators in rock art. These include More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 129–156.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Figure 4. Panel two at Cheval Bonnet with Blackfoot-style horse and human. Lines at upper right may originally have been a horse, now too eroded to identify. Illustration by author from on-site tracing by author Figure 4. Panel two at Cheval Bonnet with Blackfoot-style horse and human. Lines...
FIGURES | View All (12)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 391–418.
Published: 01 July 2014
... primarily seized captives to use them as laborers. A premeditated intention to capture enemies for adoption was seldom (if ever) the primary motivation for Comanche raids, which were fundamentally aimed at obtaining horses. These findings raise critical questions concerning widely accepted interpretations...
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 3. Panel three at Cheval Bonnet shows two coups counted by the rider of the horse drawn at the upper right. Illustration by author from on-site tracing by author Figure 3. Panel three at Cheval Bonnet shows two coups counted by the rider of the horse drawn at the upper right More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 January 2021
... used to lay out a sequence of events and related actions (Brownstone 1993 ; Petersen 1971 ). These sequences were “animated” through use of conventions such as flying arrows, horse-hoof tracks, and footprint trails, which communicated the sequence of action. Artists thus created temporal sequences...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 723–755.
Published: 01 October 2007
... colonial officials begin consistently distinguishing between Ute and Comanche groups; within a generation of the 1748 aban- donment of the Chama settlements, the Comanche besieged the colony, raiding settlements, stealing livestock, horses, and captives, and returning to their strongholds...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (3): 473–508.
Published: 01 July 2007
... of crops immediately surrounded the Blue Earth village, beyond which the tribe’s gathering realm extended for roughly one mile in either direction along the floodplain corridor. The upland prairie used by the tribe to pasture their horses was the same distance from the fields...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 237–271.
Published: 01 April 2016
... an indispensable addition to their high protein and high fat, bison-based diet.” Elsewhere he emphasizes that although horses and guns later became the main items traded, “the early exchange revolved heavily around subsistence goods [since] suffering from a chronic carbohydrate deficiency the hunting-oriented...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 245–268.
Published: 01 April 2013
... his horse, Verazadi made his way among various intoxicated residents to the public store (trading post) of La Casa Piedra (The Stone House, or today’s Old Stone Fort), owned and operated by sixty-­two-­year-­old lieutenant governor and judge of contraband seizures Captain Antonio Gil Ybarbo...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 161–162.
Published: 01 January 2021
... 2021 Lakota America begins with a famous, almost mythologized moment in American history: the Battle of the Little Bighorn (1876), where Lakota leaders Sitting Bull (Hunkpapa) and Crazy Horse (Oglala) defeated the Seventh US Cavalry Regiment under the command of George Armstrong Custer. While...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 217–240.
Published: 01 April 2015
... Press . Capture Horse George P. Vitart Anne Waldberg Michel Richard West W. Jr. 1993 Robes of Splendor: Native North American Painted Buffalo Hides . New York : New Press . Keller Ruth Lohausen Hans 1989 Rudolf Cronau: Journalist und Künstler, 1855–1939...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (4): 519–545.
Published: 01 October 2021
... . Steffen Randy . 1978 . The Horse Soldier: 1776–1943 . Vol. 2 of The Frontier, the Mexican War, the Civil War, the Indian Wars, 1851–1880 . Norman : University of Oklahoma Press . Sweeting C. G. 2011 . “ Ask MHQ: Of Belts, Sashes, and Silk Net .” Military History Quarterly 23 , no. 2...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 229–261.
Published: 01 April 2011
... before Europeans even arrived in their terri- tory. For example, by the mid-­eighteenth century, acquisition of the horse through raids of or trade with Mexican settlements to the southwest changed the Arapaho daily cycle, seasonal movement, life trajectory, and history. Prior...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (4): 549–567.
Published: 01 October 2009
... would see hundreds of white tents along a stream and beside most of the tents, a wagon and a patch of white. Upon closer inspection, the patches of white are groups of relatively motionless chickens. The chickens are tethered like horses were before the reservation days. Women are washing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 29–52.
Published: 01 January 2022
... bison hunting as they acquired more horses. These two groups oscillated between war and peace, as they competed regularly over hunting grounds on the northern plains (McCrady 2010 : 11). In 1851 the Yanktonais Sioux attacked a brigade of Métis buffalo hunters in North Dakota, which became the last...
FIGURES